Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Gene Linked To Effectiveness Of Blood Pressure Medication

Date:
February 28, 2001
Source:
Mayo Clinic
Summary:
Variation in a single gene affects how patients respond to a frequently used medication for high blood pressure, researchers at Mayo Clinic, Emory University School of Medicine and the University of Texas Health Sciences Center at Houston have found.

ROCHESTER, MINN. -- Variation in a single gene affects how patients respond to a frequently used medication for high blood pressure, researchers at Mayo Clinic, Emory University School of Medicine and the University of Texas Health Sciences Center at Houston have found.

The findings, reported in the February issue of the journal Hypertension, are among the first to pinpoint a connection between a patient’s genetic makeup and the effectiveness of a medication for a common disease. The team examined the relationship between the GNB3 gene and blood pressure response to the diuretic hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ), a first-line medication for high blood pressure. They found that differences in the gene significantly affected the decline in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure produced by the drug.

Hypertension afflicts an estimated 50 million Americans and plays a major role in cardiovascular disease, stroke and renal failure.

"We have many good medications to treat hypertension, but none of them helps every patient," says Stephen T. Turner, M.D., a Mayo Clinic hypertension specialist and the lead author of the study. "Only about 50 percent of patients will respond to any single drug like HCTZ. Therefore, many patients may have to try several different drugs or combinations before gaining control of their blood pressure. If we can understand why patients respond to some drugs but not to others, we will be able to prescribe medications at the outset that are more likely to be effective and avoid the current trial and error process of drug selection."

"This project highlights one of the most promising applications of our rapidly increasing genetic knowledge -- the ability to more precisely target the medications that we already have," says Eric Boerwinkle, Ph.D., director of the Human Genetics Center at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in Houston, Tex. "A drug’s effectiveness can vary tremendously from patient to patient. Genetic differences have long been suspected as an important cause of this variation. By establishing that this gene is a significant predictor of response to HCTZ, we’ve taken another step toward being able to tailor drug therapy to individual patients."

The research team enrolled 397 volunteers with hypertension in a study that also measured other predictors of response to the medication, such as pretreatment blood pressure, race and age, as well as the effect of the G protein B3-subunit gene, or GNB3. The clinical trials were conducted by Dr. Turner and colleague, Gary Schwartz, M.D., at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and by Arlene Chapman, M.D., associate professor at the Emory University School of Medicine Renal Division, Atlanta, Ga. Genotyping and genetic analysis were conducted by Dr. Boerwinkle in Houston.

The team analyzed blood pressure changes among patients with different combinations of the two variations of the GNB3 (C and T) gene. The project showed that the diuretic was 60 to 78 percent more effective in reducing blood pressure for the group with two copies of the T-variant of the gene compared to those with two copies of the C-variant of the gene. Of the nine predictors of blood pressure measured separately in the study, the genetic variation was the second-strongest predictor of diastolic pressure and the fourth strongest of systolic blood pressure.

"This single gene doesn’t explain all of the variation in response to HCTZ, but it does provide part of the solution," says Dr. Turner. "With all known factors combined, we can account for about 32 percent of blood pressure variation among individuals. The current study provides a solid basis for further investigation into other genes that may explain the rest, and which may someday enable us to choose medications that will have a much higher probability of effectiveness for a given patient."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Mayo Clinic. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Mayo Clinic. "Gene Linked To Effectiveness Of Blood Pressure Medication." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 February 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/02/010228080332.htm>.
Mayo Clinic. (2001, February 28). Gene Linked To Effectiveness Of Blood Pressure Medication. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/02/010228080332.htm
Mayo Clinic. "Gene Linked To Effectiveness Of Blood Pressure Medication." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/02/010228080332.htm (accessed August 2, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, August 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Texas Quintuplets Head Home

Texas Quintuplets Head Home

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 1, 2014) After four months in the hospital, the first quintuplets to be born at Baylor University Medical Center head home. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Patient Coming to U.S. for Treatment

Ebola Patient Coming to U.S. for Treatment

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 1, 2014) A U.S. aid worker infected with Ebola while working in West Africa will be treated in a high security ward at Emory University in Atlanta. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Vaccine Might Be Coming, But Where's It Been?

Ebola Vaccine Might Be Coming, But Where's It Been?

Newsy (Aug. 1, 2014) Health officials are working to fast-track a vaccine — the West-African Ebola outbreak has killed more than 700. But why didn't we already have one? Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Study Links Certain Birth Control Pills To Breast Cancer

Study Links Certain Birth Control Pills To Breast Cancer

Newsy (Aug. 1, 2014) Previous studies have made the link between birth control and breast cancer, but the latest makes the link to high-estrogen oral contraceptives. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins