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National Toxicology Program Plans To Look At Common Viruses, Radiation, Cooking By-Products For New Carcinogen Report

Date:
July 25, 2001
Source:
NIH/National Institute Of Environmental Health Sciences
Summary:
The National Toxicology Program announced today it plans to review three viruses, three forms of radiation, two substances formed in cooking, and a variety of industrial exposures for possible listing in the eleventh edition of the federal Report on Carcinogens, which will be published in 2004.

The National Toxicology Program announced today it plans to review three viruses, three forms of radiation, two substances formed in cooking, and a variety of industrial exposures for possible listing in the eleventh edition of the federal Report on Carcinogens, which will be published in 2004.

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The NTP, which is headquartered at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, prepares such a report every two years. The report is mandated by Congress to help assure that substances or conditions that are likely to cause cancer are properly recognized by the public and regulatory agencies. Substances may be listed as "known" or as "reasonably anticipated" human carcinogens.

The NTP's announcement of its plans, which was published in the Federal Register, asks the public and scientists to comment during the next 60 days on the nominations and to provide any data on whether they are carcinogenic, how much is produced, how they are used and in what ways people are exposed. The 16 nominations for NTP's planned review are:

  • 1-Amino-2,4-dibromoanthraquinone, a vat dye used in the textile industry.
  • 2-Amino-3,4-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (or MeIQ), a substance formed in food during heating or cooking and found in cooked meat and fish.
  • Cobalt Sulfate, which is used in electroplating and electrochemical industries, as a coloring agent for ceramics, as a drying agent in inks, paints, varnishes and linoleum and as a mineral supplement in animal feed.
  • Diazoaminobenzene (DAAB), which is used to promote adhesion of natural rubber to steel, as a polymer additive and an intermediate in the production of a number of pesticides, dyes and other industrial chemicals.
  • Diethanolamine (DEA), which is used in preparing liquid laundry and dishwashing detergents, cosmetics, shampoos and hair conditioners, as well as in textile processing and other industrial uses.
  • Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), a small DNA-enveloped virus that is transmitted through contact with blood and blood products or other body fluids.
  • Hepatitis C Virus (HCV), an RNA-enveloped virus mainly transmitted in blood as is HBV above.
  • High Risk Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs), small non-enveloped viruses that infect genital mucous membranes. HPV infections are common throughout the world.
  • X-radiation and gamma radiation, used in medical diagnosis and treatment, and produced in the use of atomic weapons.
  • Neutrons, which may affect patients getting neutron radiotherapy and the passengers and crew of aircraft, which are naturally bombarded by the particle.
  • Naphthalene, which is used in making many industrial chemicals, and as an ingredient in some moth balls and toilet bowl deodorants.
  • Nitrobenzene, which is used in the production of aniline, a major chemical intermediate in the production of dyes.
  • Nitromethane, a stabilizer added to many halogenated solvents and aerosol propellants.
  • Phenylimidazopyridine, which, like MeIQ (second item), is formed in food during heating and cooking and is found in cooked meat and fish.
  • 4,4'-Thiodianiline, which is an intermediate in the manufacture of several dyes.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by NIH/National Institute Of Environmental Health Sciences. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

NIH/National Institute Of Environmental Health Sciences. "National Toxicology Program Plans To Look At Common Viruses, Radiation, Cooking By-Products For New Carcinogen Report." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 July 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/07/010725081551.htm>.
NIH/National Institute Of Environmental Health Sciences. (2001, July 25). National Toxicology Program Plans To Look At Common Viruses, Radiation, Cooking By-Products For New Carcinogen Report. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/07/010725081551.htm
NIH/National Institute Of Environmental Health Sciences. "National Toxicology Program Plans To Look At Common Viruses, Radiation, Cooking By-Products For New Carcinogen Report." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/07/010725081551.htm (accessed February 27, 2015).

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