Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Meningitis Clotting Pathway Cracked By UK And US Scientists

Date:
August 9, 2001
Source:
Imperial College Of Science, Technology And Medicine
Summary:
Researchers in the UK and US report in the New England Journal of Medicine this week (9 August) the results of a study in children which may explain why patients with meningococcal septicaemia develop widespread clotting within blood vessels leading to death or loss of limb and digits.

Researchers in the UK and US report in the New England Journal of Medicine this week (9 August) the results of a study in children which may explain why patients with meningococcal septicaemia develop widespread clotting within blood vessels leading to death or loss of limb and digits.

The team from Imperial College and St Mary’s Hospital, London, in collaboration with research groups at the University of Bristol, UK, and Oklahoma, USA, say that their work offers new directions for treatment of the blood poisoning form of meningitis.

In healthy individuals, a number of proteins are present in the blood which act to prevent clots forming in veins and arteries. One of these is a recently identified protein called Protein C, which when activated is a powerful inhibitor of clot formation.

The NEJM study of 21 children establishes for the first time that patients suffering from meningococcal septicaemia have lost two key proteins (thrombomodulin and endothelial Protein C receptor) required to activate Protein C on the lining of blood vessels.

This serious defect leads to an inability to control clotting within arteries and veins and opens the way to widespread clot formation, a hallmark of meningococcal septicaemia, often visible as rashes on the skin.

To date the development of effective treatments to prevent or reverse this clot formation has been hampered by a lack of understanding of the mechanisms involved.

Leader of the study Professor Michael Levin of Imperial College said:

“Our study has identified a key mechanism involved in the devastating complications of meningococcal disease, and offers new insights into how the disease might best be treated.

“A defect in the activation of Protein C could, theoretically, be treated by administration of Protein C in its active form, thus by-passing the requirements for activation on the surfaces of blood vessels.”

Clinical trials are currently underway to assess the safety and feasibility of this treatment.

Denise Vaughan, Chief Executive of funders Meningitis Research Foundation said:

“We are delighted with the outcome of this research which has the potential to prevent death and disability from meningitis and septicaemia.”

The authors of the paper are Dr Saul Faust, Professor Michael Levin, Odile Harrison, Dr Robert Goldin and Dr Sheila Kondaveeti (Imperial College and St Mary’s Hospital, UK); Dr Charles Esmon and Marion Lockhart (Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, USA); Dr Zoltan Lasik (University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, USA); and Dr Robert Heyderman (University of Bristol, UK).

The programme of research has been supported by a grant from the Meningitis Research Foundation grant in excess of UKP700,000, with additional support via a training fellowship from the Medical Research Council.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Imperial College Of Science, Technology And Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Imperial College Of Science, Technology And Medicine. "Meningitis Clotting Pathway Cracked By UK And US Scientists." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 August 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/08/010809071546.htm>.
Imperial College Of Science, Technology And Medicine. (2001, August 9). Meningitis Clotting Pathway Cracked By UK And US Scientists. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/08/010809071546.htm
Imperial College Of Science, Technology And Medicine. "Meningitis Clotting Pathway Cracked By UK And US Scientists." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/08/010809071546.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Generics Eat Into Pfizer's Sales

Generics Eat Into Pfizer's Sales

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 29, 2014) Pfizer, the world's largest drug maker, cut full-year revenue forecasts because generics could cut into sales of its anti-arthritis drug, Celebrex. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Nigeria Ups Ebola Stakes on 1st Death

Nigeria Ups Ebola Stakes on 1st Death

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 29, 2014) Nigerian authorities have shut and quarantined a Lagos hospital where a Liberian man died of the Ebola virus, the first recorded case of the highly-infectious disease in Africa's most populous economy. David Pollard reports Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Running 5 Minutes A Day Might Add Years To Your Life

Running 5 Minutes A Day Might Add Years To Your Life

Newsy (July 29, 2014) According to a new study, just five minutes of running or jogging a day could add years to your life. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Outbreak Poses Little Threat To U.S.: CDC

Ebola Outbreak Poses Little Threat To U.S.: CDC

Newsy (July 29, 2014) The Ebola outbreak in West Africa poses little threat to Americans, according to officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins