Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Enzyme Increases Number, Size Of Heart Muscle Cells In Mice

Date:
August 22, 2001
Source:
Baylor College Of Medicine
Summary:
Mice that were genetically engineered to produce a protein found in embryos and stem cells produce more as well as bigger heart cells, which live longer than those in normal mice, according to scientists at Baylor College of Medicine.

HOUSON -- Mice that were genetically engineered to produce a protein found in embryos and stem cells produce more as well as bigger heart cells, which live longer than those in normal mice, according to scientists at Baylor College of Medicine.

Related Articles


The report, in the Aug. 21 online version of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and in the Aug. 28 printed edition, advances the understanding of how heart muscle cells proliferate and grow and could prove important in treating the 1.5 million Americans who suffer heart attacks each year and the 4.7 million who have congestive heart failure.

“Understanding how this enzyme works gives us new information about normal control of heart muscle growth and could be important in bringing gene-based and cell-based therapies to bear on diseases of the heart,” said Dr. Michael Schneider, senior author of the paper and a professor of medicine, cell biology, and molecular physiology and biophysics at Baylor.

Schneider and his co-workers engineered mice genetically to continue producing the enzyme telomerase reverse transcriptase, or TERT, in heart muscle after birth. TERT enables the ends of the chromosomes, called telomeres, to be copied completely during cell division. Telomeres cap the ends of chromosomes, like plastic tips on shoelaces. Ordinarily, after organisms are born, TERT production stops in most types of cells, and telomeres shorten in the process of aging.

The mice produced in Schneider’s laboratory make TERT at concentrations usually seen only in embryos. In the first month after birth, heart muscle cells in the mice hearts continued to proliferate, dividing and making more cells at a time when there would usually be no new cells. TERT production continued as the mice aged, but eventually the cells stopped dividing and instead grew bigger. This condition, called hypertrophy, usually weakens heart muscle. However, tests show that the hearts in the mice resembled the enlarged organs of healthy, well-trained athletes, without the stiffness seen in heart disease.

Perhaps most importantly from a clinical perspective, Schneider said, mice that continued to express TERT did not lose as many heart muscle cells during a heart attack as normal mice.

“We believe that the effect of adding TERT to an adult heart would be protection from the kind of cell death that occurs during a heart attack as well as production of bigger heart muscle cells,” Schneider said. The enzyme could also be added when cells are grafted onto an injured heart, he said.

Other Baylor collaborators included Drs. Hidemasa Oh, George E. Taffet, Keith A. Youker, Mark L. Entman, Paul A. Overbeek and Lloyd H. Michael.

This work was supported by research grants from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and by the M. D. Anderson Foundation.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Baylor College Of Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Baylor College Of Medicine. "Enzyme Increases Number, Size Of Heart Muscle Cells In Mice." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 August 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/08/010821074944.htm>.
Baylor College Of Medicine. (2001, August 22). Enzyme Increases Number, Size Of Heart Muscle Cells In Mice. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/08/010821074944.htm
Baylor College Of Medicine. "Enzyme Increases Number, Size Of Heart Muscle Cells In Mice." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/08/010821074944.htm (accessed October 31, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, October 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Fauci Says Ebola Risk in US "essentially Zero"

Fauci Says Ebola Risk in US "essentially Zero"

AP (Oct. 30, 2014) NIAID Director Anthony Fauci said the risk of Ebola becoming an epidemic in the U.S. is essentially zero Thursday at the Washington Ideas Forum. He also said an Ebola vaccine will be tested in West Africa in the next few months. (Oct. 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Nurse Defies Ebola Quarantine With Bike Ride

Nurse Defies Ebola Quarantine With Bike Ride

AP (Oct. 30, 2014) A nurse who vowed to defy Maine's voluntary quarantine for health care workers who treated Ebola patients followed through on her promise Thursday, leaving her home for an hour-long bike ride. (Oct. 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Pot-Infused Edibles Raise Concerns in Colorado

Pot-Infused Edibles Raise Concerns in Colorado

AFP (Oct. 30, 2014) Colorado may have legalized marijuana for recreational use, but the debate around the decision still continues, with a recent - failed - attempt to ban cannabis-infused edibles. Duration: 01:53 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
British Navy Ship Arrives in Sierra Leone With Ebola Aid

British Navy Ship Arrives in Sierra Leone With Ebola Aid

AFP (Oct. 30, 2014) The British ship RFA ARGUS arrived in Sierra Leone to deliver supplies and equipment to help the fight against Ebola. Duration: 00:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins