Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

NIST "Microhotplate" May Help Search For Extraterrestrial Life

Date:
November 28, 2001
Source:
National Institute Of Standards And Technology
Summary:
Astronauts or unmanned space vehicles may one day detect and quantitate the gases found on other planets using tiny chemical sensors—each measuring about 100 microns, approaching the width of a human hair—based on a design developed at NIST.

Astronauts or unmanned space vehicles may one day detect and quantitate the gases found on other planets using tiny chemical sensors—each measuring about 100 microns, approaching the width of a human hair—based on a design developed at NIST.

NIST researchers are collaborating with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory to adapt NIST’s “microhotplate” technology for use in space applications, such as detecting biogenic (produced by living organisms) gases in planetary atmospheres, investigating organic materials on comets for studies of the history of the universe, or monitoring air quality in habitats. This advanced measurement system already has proven applicable to environmental monitoring and military operations.

A microhotplate is a tiny machined structure consisting of a heater, a metal thermometer/heat distribution plate and electrical contacts, all separated by insulating layers. Sensing films are deposited on the structures. The device relies on changes in electrical conductance in the sensing film to detect the presence of adsorbed gases. Temperature changes may be used to create response “fingerprints” for different gases. Gas mixtures can be analyzed with sensor arrays of multiple microhotplate devices.

Advantages of a microhotplate for use in space include its small size, light weight, and low power and maintenance requirements. It has the potential to provide almost instant chemical analysis or collect samples over time to detect small amounts of gases.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Institute Of Standards And Technology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

National Institute Of Standards And Technology. "NIST "Microhotplate" May Help Search For Extraterrestrial Life." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 November 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/11/011120050212.htm>.
National Institute Of Standards And Technology. (2001, November 28). NIST "Microhotplate" May Help Search For Extraterrestrial Life. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/11/011120050212.htm
National Institute Of Standards And Technology. "NIST "Microhotplate" May Help Search For Extraterrestrial Life." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/11/011120050212.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

Share This




More Space & Time News

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Supply Ship Takes Off for International Space Station

Supply Ship Takes Off for International Space Station

AFP (July 30, 2014) The European Space Agency's fifth Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV-5) is takes off to the International Space Station on an Ariane 5 rocket from French Guiana. Duration: 00:34 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Rocket Launches Into Space With Cargo Ship

Raw: Rocket Launches Into Space With Cargo Ship

AP (July 30, 2014) Arianespace launched a rocket Tuesday from French Guiana carrying a robotic cargo ship to deliver provisions to the International Space Station. (July 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
In Virginia, the Rise of a New Space Coast

In Virginia, the Rise of a New Space Coast

AP (July 30, 2014) Every summer, tourists make the pilgrimage to Chincoteague Island, Va. to see wild ponies cross the Assateague Channel. But, it's the rockets sending to supplies to the International Space Station that are making this a year-round destination. (July 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Russia Saves Gecko Sex Satellite, Media Has Some Fun With It

Russia Saves Gecko Sex Satellite, Media Has Some Fun With It

Newsy (July 27, 2014) The satellite is back under ground control after a tense few days, but with a gecko sex experiment on board, the media just couldn't help themselves. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile: iPhone Android Web
      Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins