Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Study Suggests Insulin May Have Potential To Prevent Thrombosis Leading To Heart Attack And Stroke

Date:
March 22, 2002
Source:
University At Buffalo
Summary:
Insulin may interfere with the cascade of reactions that promote clot formation and platelet aggregation in heart-attack patients and may help prevent clot formation and plaque development in persons at risk of heart attack and stroke, new research by University at Buffalo endocrinologists has shown.

BUFFALO, N.Y. -- Insulin may interfere with the cascade of reactions that promote clot formation and platelet aggregation in heart-attack patients and may help prevent clot formation and plaque development in persons at risk of heart attack and stroke, new research by University at Buffalo endocrinologists has shown.

Related Articles


The researchers have demonstrated that an infusion of insulin and glucose suppresses a factor that regulates genes for two pro-inflammatory proteins that promote coagulation and clot formation in smooth muscle tissue lining blood vessels.

Results of the study appear in the March issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

"Our earlier research showed for the first time that insulin exerts a significant anti-inflammatory effect on blood vessel walls, and now we have linked insulin with the mechanisms that reduce clotting factors," said Paresh Dandona, M.D., UB professor of medicine and senior author on the study.

"These new findings suggest that insulin has the potential to prevent thrombosis that leads to heart attack and stroke. It also may be useful to treat persons with those conditions through the prevention of clotting and promotion of dissolution of clots."

Dandona said the findings in this study add relevance to results from the Diabetes and Insulin-Glucose Infusion in Acute Myocardial Infarction (DIGAMI) study, conducted in Stockholm, which showed that diabetic patients experiencing an acute heart attack who received a low dose infusion of insulin and glucose had a better outcome than patients who weren't infused. "The DIGAMI study showed that insulin has a positive effect on acute myocardial infarction, but the mechanisms weren't clear," he said. "Our studies are defining the mechanisms."

The current investigation targeted a pro-inflammatory transcription factor, early growth response gene-1 (Egr-1), and concentrations in blood plasma of two proteins whose expression is regulated by Egr-1 -- tissue factor (TF) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). The gene responds rapidly to a variety of stimuli related to tissue oxygen deprivation and physical damage to blood vessels, Dandona said, and appears to play an important role in the development of human and mouse atherosclerosis. The protein TF leads, via a complex cascade of actions, to the formation of fibrin, the essential ingredient of a blood clot, while fibrin's predecessor thrombin is a powerful aggregator of platelets, a primary component of arterial plaque. The protein PAI-1 prevents the normal breakdown of fibrin, which would help prevent clotting.

In this study, 10 subjects who had high levels of the factors in question due to obesity received an intravenous solution of insulin plus dextrose. The dextrose prevents hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. They provided fasting blood samples before infusion and at two, four and six hours following infusion.

The samples were assayed for Egr-1, and both proteins. Results showed that after four hours of infusion, blood levels of Egr-1 had fallen, on average, to 47 percent of pre-infusion levels. PAI-1 levels had decreased on average to 58 percent and TF levels to 85 percent on average, compared to baseline.

Dandona said it is possible that insulin may support the action of other clot busters and clot preventers currently used in heart attacks and strokes.

Additional researchers on the study were Ahmad Aljada, Ph.D., UB research assistant professor of medicine; Husam Ghanim, doctoral student working with Dandona; Priya Mohanty, UB clinical instructor of medicine, and Neeti Kapur, UB research assistant.

The research, supported by the McGowan Charitable Fund, was conducted at the Diabetes-Endocrinology Center of Western New York, which Dandona directs.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University At Buffalo. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University At Buffalo. "Study Suggests Insulin May Have Potential To Prevent Thrombosis Leading To Heart Attack And Stroke." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 March 2002. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/03/020322074355.htm>.
University At Buffalo. (2002, March 22). Study Suggests Insulin May Have Potential To Prevent Thrombosis Leading To Heart Attack And Stroke. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 29, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/03/020322074355.htm
University At Buffalo. "Study Suggests Insulin May Have Potential To Prevent Thrombosis Leading To Heart Attack And Stroke." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/03/020322074355.htm (accessed March 29, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, March 29, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

S. Leone in New Anti-Ebola Lockdown

S. Leone in New Anti-Ebola Lockdown

AFP (Mar. 28, 2015) Sierra Leone imposed a three-day nationwide lockdown Friday for the second time in six months in a bid to prevent a resurgence of the deadly Ebola virus. Duration: 01:17 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
These Popular Antibiotics Can Cause Permanent Nerve Damage

These Popular Antibiotics Can Cause Permanent Nerve Damage

Newsy (Mar. 27, 2015) A popular class of antibiotic can leave patients in severe pain and even result in permanent nerve damage. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
WH Plan to Fight Antibiotic-Resistant Germs

WH Plan to Fight Antibiotic-Resistant Germs

AP (Mar. 27, 2015) The White House on Friday announced a five-year plan to fight the threat posed by antibiotic-resistant bacteria amid fears that once-treatable germs could become deadly. (March 27) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

AP (Mar. 26, 2015) In rare bipartisan harmony, congressional leaders pushed a $214 billion bill permanently blocking physician Medicare cuts toward House passage Thursday, moving lawmakers closer to resolving a problem that has plagued them for years. (March 26) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins