Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

UCLA Study Names 10 Keys To Recovery From Schizophrenia

Date:
December 6, 2002
Source:
University Of California - Los Angeles
Summary:
UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute researchers have identified 10 key factors to recovery from schizophrenia. The findings open opportunities to develop new treatment and rehabilitation programs and to reshape the negative expectations of many doctors, patients and their families.

UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute researchers have identified 10 key factors to recovery from schizophrenia. The findings open opportunities to develop new treatment and rehabilitation programs and to reshape the negative expectations of many doctors, patients and their families.

Based on analyses of the professional literature and the cases of 23 schizophrenia patients who successfully returned to work or school with their symptoms under control, the findings appear in the November 2002 edition of the International Review of Psychiatry.

Factors detailed in the study that influenced recovery included 1) family relationships, 2) substance abuse, 3) duration of untreated psychosis, 4) initial response to medication, 5) adherence to treatment, 6) supportive therapeutic relationships, 7) cognitive abilities, 8) social skills, 9) personal history and 10) access to care.

"Our findings join a growing body of research that flies in the face of the long-held notion that individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia are doomed to a life of disability with little expectation for productive involvement in society, a fatalistic view that in itself is damaging to prospects for recovery," said lead author Dr. Robert P. Liberman, a research scientist at the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute and professor of psychiatry at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.

"By understanding the dynamics of recovery, we can design more effective courses of treatment and combat the pessimism held by many doctors, patients and families struggling to cope with this debilitating disease," said Liberman, director of the UCLA Psychiatric Rehabilitation Program and Center for Research on Treatment and Rehabilitation of Psychosis. "Increasing the rate of recovery from schizophrenia will help destigmatize this disease, reduce the emotional burden on families, and lighten the financial weight on communities, states and the nation."

Liberman and his collaborator, Dr. Alex Kopelowicz, medical director of the San Fernando Mental Health Center and associate professor of psychiatry at UCLA, edited the November 2002 edition of the International Review of Psychiatry. Their articles are joined by those from an international array of investigators on the process of recovery, prospects for improving schizophrenia treatment and suggestions for future research.

The findings:

Factors identified as keys to recovery from schizophrenia included:

1. Family relationships: Family stress is a powerful predictor of relapse, while family education and emotional support decrease the rate of relapse. Among study participants, 70 percent reported good or very good family relationships.

2. Substance abuse: National Institute of Mental Health research estimates the prevalence of lifetime substance abuse among schizophrenia patients at 47 percent, well above the overall rate. Though three-quarters of the study participants reported substance abuse prior to treatment, just 17.4 percent reported abuse after the onset of schizophrenia. None reported illicit drug use in the past year, and just two reported occasional alcohol consumption.

3. Duration of untreated psychosis: Longer duration of symptoms prior to treatment correlates directly with greater time to remission and a lesser degree of remission. Among study participants, only 13 percent reported a delay of more than a year between the onset of symptoms and treatment.

4. Initial response to medication: Improvement of symptoms within days of receiving antipsychotic drugs significantly predicts long-term results of treatment. Among the study group, 87 percent reported effective control of symptoms with their first antipsychotic medication.

5. Adherence to treatment: Failure to take antipsychotic medication as prescribed hampers both short-term and long-term recovery. All study participants reported adherence to psychiatric care and medication regimens.

6. Supportive therapy: Positive relationships with psychiatrists, therapists and/or treatment teams engender hope and are essential to improvement. Among study participants, 91 percent reported ongoing psychotherapy, and 78 percent reported that accessible and supportive psychiatrists and therapists contributed to their recovery.

7. Cognitive abilities: Neurocognitive factors such as working memory, sustained attention and efficient visual perception are strong predictors of recovery. Among study participants, all showed normal or near normal functioning on tests of flexibility in solving problems, verbal working memory and perceptual skills.

8. Social skills: Negative symptoms, or poor interpersonal skills relative to social expectations, correlate with the degree of disability caused by schizophrenia. No study participants showed more than very mild negative symptoms.

9. Personal history: Premorbid factors, or those in place prior to the onset of the disease, that affect treatment outcome include education and IQ, age of onset, rapidity of onset, work history, and social skills. Among study participants, level of education was used as a measure of premorbid history. A total of 70 percent graduated from college before becoming ill, and an additional 13 percent completed two years of college. Three of the remaining four subjects worked full time before their illness began.

10. Access to care: Continuous, comprehensive, consumer-oriented and coordinated treatment is crucial to recovery. Among study participants, 91 percent reported receiving antipsychotic medication and psychotherapy, 47.8 percent social skills training, 56.5 percent family participation, 26 percent vocational rehabilitation, and 61 percent benefits from self-help groups.

The study:

Schizophrenia encompasses a group of psychotic disorders characterized by disturbances in thought, perception, emotion, behavior and communication that last longer than six months. In addition, the disorders are associated with disability in work, school, social relations and independent living skills.

The cause or causes of schizophrenia is unknown. Genetic factors may play a role, as identical twins and other close relatives of a person with schizophrenia are more likely to develop the disorder. Psychological and social factors, such as drug abuse, stressful life challenges and interpersonal relationships, may also play a role in development.

In identifying factors to recovery, Liberman and his team reviewed a growing body of literature that show recovery from schizophrenia can occur under two conditions: 1) when the disorder is treated early with assertive case management and use of antipsychotic medication; and 2) when more chronic or relapsing forms are treated for lengthy periods of time with comprehensive, continuous care.

In addition, the researchers examined the cases of 23 schizophrenia patients who met specific recovery criteria, including remission of symptoms as well as successful functioning at work and school, independent living and social relationships.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of California - Los Angeles. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of California - Los Angeles. "UCLA Study Names 10 Keys To Recovery From Schizophrenia." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 December 2002. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/12/021206075728.htm>.
University Of California - Los Angeles. (2002, December 6). UCLA Study Names 10 Keys To Recovery From Schizophrenia. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/12/021206075728.htm
University Of California - Los Angeles. "UCLA Study Names 10 Keys To Recovery From Schizophrenia." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/12/021206075728.htm (accessed August 27, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Predicting Heart Transplant Rejection With a Blood Test

Predicting Heart Transplant Rejection With a Blood Test

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) Now a new approach to rejection of donor organs could change the way doctors predict transplant rejection…without expensive, invasive procedures. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Better Braces That Vibrate

Better Braces That Vibrate

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) The length of time you have to keep your braces on could be cut in half thanks to a new device that speeds up the process. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Smartphone App Tracks Your Heart Rate

Smartphone App Tracks Your Heart Rate

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) A new app that can track your heart rate 24/7 is available for download in your app store and its convenience could save your life. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Stroke in Young Adults

Stroke in Young Adults

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) A stroke can happen at any time and affect anyone regardless of age. This mother chose to give her son independence and continue to live a normal life after he had a stroke at 18 years old. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins