Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Scientists Discover How To Grow Cells That Suppress Immune Responses

Date:
January 23, 2003
Source:
Washington University School Of Medicine
Summary:
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered how to grow a little-understood type of human immune cell. The cells, known as T-regulatory cells type 1 (Tr1), are thought to turn off unnecessary immune reactions and to block the action of immune cells that otherwise would attack the body and cause dangerous inflammation.

St. Louis, Jan. 22, 2003 — Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered how to grow a little-understood type of human immune cell. The cells, known as T-regulatory cells type 1 (Tr1), are thought to turn off unnecessary immune reactions and to block the action of immune cells that otherwise would attack the body and cause dangerous inflammation. The findings are reported in the Jan. 23 issue of the journal Nature.

Related Articles


“T-regulator cells have become an important area of immunology,” says John P. Atkinson, M.D., the Samuel B. Grant Professor of Medicine and professor of molecular microbiology, who led the study. “But no one has known how to grow them in the laboratory. These findings will let that promising research move forward.”

Research using laboratory-grown Tr1 cells could lead to new treatments for autoimmune diseases such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis and for organ rejection following transplantation, and could provide a better understanding of measles, meningitis and other infectious diseases.

“We now can take a blood sample from someone’s arm, culture selected cells from that sample and a few days later have a nice population of T-regulatory cells,” says first author Claudia Kemper, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow in Atkinson’s laboratory. “To be able to manipulate the activity of Tr1 cells for future therapeutic use relies heavily on knowing the factors required for their differentiation and function.”

In 1985, Atkinson’s team discovered a protein known as CD46 on cell surfaces. Usually this protein protects cells from being destroyed by a component of the immune system known as complement.

In this study, Kemper and her colleagues found that stimulating CD46 and a second cell-surface molecule known as T-cell receptor caused certain kinds of immune cells called T lymphocytes to grow, divide and give off a substance known as interleukin-10 (IL-10).

The team established the finding by growing Tr1 cells in culture dishes for several days, drawing off some of the fluid bathing the cells and adding that fluid to other dishes containing activated, proliferating infection-fighting T cells. The fluid, which contained IL-10 produced by the Tr1 cells, shut down the growth and activity of the T cells.

“That was a very good day,” says Kemper. “IL-10 is the classic substance that suppresses the action and proliferation of other immune cells.”

The investigators next want to study how CD46 triggers production of IL-10 and to better define the population of cells that give rise to Tr1 cells. They also want to explore how viruses, including those that cause measles, meningitis and herpes, interact with CD46.

“It’s tempting to think that these pathogens dock with CD46 because it causes some cells to produce IL-10, which would suppress the action of nearby immune cells and help the pathogen survive,” says Kemper. “We can investigate such questions because we can now grow these cells in the laboratory.”

Kemper C, Chan AC, Green JM, Brett KA, Murphy KM, Atkinson JP. Activation of human CD4+ cells with CD3 and CD46 induces a T-regulatory cell 1 phenotype. Nature, Jan. 23, 2003.

Funding from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases supported this research.

The full-time and volunteer faculty of Washington University School of Medicine are the physicians and surgeons of Barnes-Jewish and St. Louis Children's hospitals. The School of Medicine is one of the leading medical research, teaching and patient-care institutions in the nation. Through its affiliations with Barnes-Jewish and St. Louis Children's hospitals, the School of Medicine is linked to BJC HealthCare.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Washington University School Of Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Washington University School Of Medicine. "Scientists Discover How To Grow Cells That Suppress Immune Responses." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 January 2003. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/01/030123073553.htm>.
Washington University School Of Medicine. (2003, January 23). Scientists Discover How To Grow Cells That Suppress Immune Responses. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/01/030123073553.htm
Washington University School Of Medicine. "Scientists Discover How To Grow Cells That Suppress Immune Responses." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/01/030123073553.htm (accessed November 1, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, November 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Melafind: Spotting Melanoma Without a Biopsy

Melafind: Spotting Melanoma Without a Biopsy

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) The MelaFind device is a pain-free way to check suspicious moles for melanoma, without the need for a biopsy. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Battling Multiple Myeloma

Battling Multiple Myeloma

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) The answer isn’t always found in new drugs – repurposing an ‘old’ drug that could mean better multiple myeloma treatment, and hope. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Chronic Inflammation and Prostate Cancer

Chronic Inflammation and Prostate Cancer

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) New information that is linking chronic inflammation in the prostate and prostate cancer, which may help doctors and patients prevent cancer in the future. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sickle Cell: Stopping Kids’ Silent Strokes

Sickle Cell: Stopping Kids’ Silent Strokes

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) Blood transfusions are proving crucial to young sickle cell patients by helping prevent strokes, even when there is no outward sign of brain injury. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins