Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Dr. Robot Tested At Hopkins

Date:
August 7, 2003
Source:
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
Summary:
It lacks the warm bedside manner of Marcus Welby or Dr. Kildare, but a high-tech robot being tested at The Johns Hopkins Hospital could be used to link patients with their physicians in a whole new way.

It lacks the warm bedside manner of Marcus Welby or Dr. Kildare, but a high-tech robot being tested at The Johns Hopkins Hospital could be used to link patients with their physicians in a whole new way.

Related Articles


Vaguely resembling a human torso, in a Star Wars R2D2 sort of way, the robot sports a computer screen for a head, a video camera for eyes and a speaker for a mouth. It walks, in a manner of speaking, on three balls, talks, and most importantly, listens. "That's because the robot is directly linked to a real doctor who uses the robot as it ears, mouth and eyes," says Louis Kavoussi, M.D., Hopkins professor of urology and a pioneer in robotic surgery. "And patients love it. I was very surprised how much our patients enjoy remote video interactions via the robot.

According to Kavoussi, the positive response to the robot supports the results of earlier studies done at Hopkins that found patients like using teleconferencing technology, in addition to traditional bedside visits, to communicate with their physicians. "Any technology that facilitates communications between patient and physician is welcome by both," he says.

Billed as the world's first remote-presence robot by its manufacturer, InTouch Health Inc, the robotic system works something like an ultrarealistic video game, complete with a joystick for moving it about. Looking at a computer terminal, the doctor directing the robot sees what the robot sees and hears what the robot hears. At the other end, patients can see and talk to the doctor's face displayed on a flat screen that sits on the robot's "shoulders." All of this is connected to the Internet via broadband and a wireless network. "Many health care facilities and long-term care communities lack the resources to maintain a staff of all the medial specialists needed," says Kavoussi. "The robot has the potential to fill this vacuum by enabling remote medical experts to 'virtually' consult with caregivers, patients, residents and family members at the point of care, whenever and wherever they are needed."

So far, Dr. Robot has visited 20 patients, Kavoussi says. "Generally, the robot has been used to check up on patients in between when they would normally see a physician. During these visits, we ask them about how they are feeling, inspect their surgical sites to ensure they are healing properly, and answer any questions they have."

He points out that while robots will never totally replace the human touch that physicians provide their patients in person, they can augment the regular interactions between patients and their physicians as well as be useful when it's not practical or possible to physically send in physicians, such as in military operations, natural or bioterrorist disasters, at sea, or in other remote or underserved locations."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. "Dr. Robot Tested At Hopkins." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 August 2003. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/08/030807075959.htm>.
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. (2003, August 7). Dr. Robot Tested At Hopkins. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 5, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/08/030807075959.htm
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. "Dr. Robot Tested At Hopkins." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/08/030807075959.htm (accessed March 5, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Computers & Math News

Thursday, March 5, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

More Details Emerge On HBO Subscription Streaming Service

More Details Emerge On HBO Subscription Streaming Service

Newsy (Mar. 5, 2015) HBO&apos;s subscription streaming service may see an April launch. The service will reportedly cost $15 a month and will likely be available on Apple TV. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Redheads Call For Representation Among Apple Emojis

Redheads Call For Representation Among Apple Emojis

Newsy (Mar. 4, 2015) Some redheads and their supporters are petitioning Apple to include a red-haired emoji. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Largest Gathering of Games Developers in San Francisco

Largest Gathering of Games Developers in San Francisco

AFP (Mar. 4, 2015) The 2015 Games Developers Conference, the largest gathering of its kind, brings professionals from all over the world together in San Francisco to reflect on on the art and science of games creation. Duration: 01:13 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
'FREAK' Attack Courtesy Of Age-Old Government Policies

'FREAK' Attack Courtesy Of Age-Old Government Policies

Newsy (Mar. 4, 2015) "FREAK" attack allows hackers to gain access to your encrypted data. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins