Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Study Shows Younger Women Don’t Die A Sudden Cardiac Death For The Same Reasons As Men

Date:
October 13, 2003
Source:
Oregon Health & Science University
Summary:
The number of women in their 30s and 40s who experience sudden cardiac death is increasing much faster than the number of men of the same age who experience sudden cardiac death. But a study led by an Oregon Health & Sciences University cardiac researcher has found men and women are not dying from the same causes.

The number of women in their 30s and 40s who experience sudden cardiac death is increasing much faster than the number of men of the same age who experience sudden cardiac death. But a study led by an Oregon Health & Sciences University cardiac researcher has found men and women are not dying from the same causes. Sudden cardiac death in men is usually caused by coronary heart disease or other specific causes. However, researchers did not find a specific cause of sudden cardiac death for 50 percent of the women they studied. The study was published this month in the American Heart Journal.

"This was an unexpected finding. However, the study underscores the need to focus on what is causing these younger women to die unexpectedly because the number of deaths continues to increase," said Sumeet Chugh, M.D., associate professor of medicine (cardiology) in the OHSU School of Medicine.

Chugh and his colleagues compared 27 women between the ages of 35 and 44 years and 45 men of the same age group. All died of a sudden cardiac death between 1984 and 1996 in the same geographic community. The analysis included a review of available clinical information, autopsy findings and detailed pathologic assessment of the heart. The research was conducted in collaboration with the Jesse E. Edwards Cardiovascular Registry in St. Paul, Minn., where all the patients were referred.

A year ago a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found the rate of sudden cardiac deaths increasing in women between 35 and 44 years of age more than the rate among men in that age range. Chugh and his team wanted to find out why and theorized that it might be a difference in men and women. Their study found the difference was in the causes of death, which were undetermined in 50 percent of the women.

"The chances are that in younger women sudden cardiac deaths are more complicated than in young men. We need to hone in on novel, unorthodox causes," said Chugh.

Chugh has a study under way that is already doing that. The Oregon Sudden Unexplained Death Study, or SUDS, focuses on the discovery of novel mechanisms of sudden cardiac arrest in patients who do not have coronary heart disease or other known cardiac disorders. In the process, these investigators identify and study all instances of sudden cardiac arrest in Multnomah County, thereby gathering critical community-based data. So far, the SUDS project has collected one and a half years of such information, and the study is ongoing.

Sudden cardiac death is a significant health threat in Oregon. The CDC reports that more than 70 percent of cardiac deaths in Oregon are sudden, one of the highest percentages in the country. The overwhelming majority of these patients have associated coronary heart disease.

This study was funded in part by the American Heart Association.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Oregon Health & Science University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Oregon Health & Science University. "Study Shows Younger Women Don’t Die A Sudden Cardiac Death For The Same Reasons As Men." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 October 2003. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/10/031012233946.htm>.
Oregon Health & Science University. (2003, October 13). Study Shows Younger Women Don’t Die A Sudden Cardiac Death For The Same Reasons As Men. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/10/031012233946.htm
Oregon Health & Science University. "Study Shows Younger Women Don’t Die A Sudden Cardiac Death For The Same Reasons As Men." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/10/031012233946.htm (accessed September 18, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

The Cost of Ebola

The Cost of Ebola

Reuters - Business Video Online (Sep. 18, 2014) As Sierra Leone prepares for a three-day "lockdown" in its latest bid to stem the spread of Ebola, Ciara Lee looks at the financial implications of fighting the largest ever outbreak of the disease. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
What HealthKit Bug Means For Your iOS Fitness Apps

What HealthKit Bug Means For Your iOS Fitness Apps

Newsy (Sep. 18, 2014) Apple has delayed the launch of the HealthKit app platform, citing a bug. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Residents Vaccinated as Haiti Fights Cholera Epidemic

Residents Vaccinated as Haiti Fights Cholera Epidemic

AFP (Sep. 18, 2014) Haitians receive the second dose of the vaccine against cholera as part of the UN's vaccination campaign. Duration: 00:34 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Elephant Undergoes Surgery in Tbilisi Zoo

Raw: Elephant Undergoes Surgery in Tbilisi Zoo

AP (Sep. 18, 2014) Grand the elephant has successfully undergone surgery to remove a portion of infected tusk at Tbilisi Zoo in Georgia. British veterinary surgeons used an electric drill to extract the infected piece. (Sept. 18) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins