Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Thailand Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Epidemics Spread In Waves Emanating From Bangkok

Date:
January 22, 2004
Source:
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School Of Public Health
Summary:
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health studying dengue hemorrhagic fever epidemics in Thailand have determined that the disease radiates outward in a traveling wave from Bangkok, the nation's largest city, to infect every province in the country.

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health studying dengue hemorrhagic fever epidemics in Thailand have determined that the disease radiates outward in a traveling wave from Bangkok, the nation's largest city, to infect every province in the country. According to the researchers' analysis, the spatial-temporal wave travels at a speed of 148 kilometers per month and takes about eight months to spread through the entire country. The analysis appears in the January 22, 2004, edition of the journal Nature.

Related Articles


"We used a new mathematical technique developed by NASA for analysis of waves in physical materials – like water waves and sound waves – to study "epidemic waves" of dengue cases. Our study is the first step to understanding the mechanism of how a disease like dengue spreads through the country," said lead author Derek Cummings, a PhD candidate at the Johns Hopkins University's Bloomberg School of Public of Health and Whiting School of Engineering. "Anticipating dengue epidemics and determining the causes of those epidemics could help us plan control strategies more effectively."

Dengue fever is a mosquito-borne illness that infects 50 million to 100 million people worldwide each year, many of them children. Epidemics of the most serious and life-threatening form of the disease, dengue hemorrhagic fever, place a heavy burden on public health systems.

The number of cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever in Thailand varies widely from year to year. Cummings and his colleagues examined the spatial-temporal dynamics of dengue hemorrhagic fever in a data-set describing 850,000 infections that occurred between 1983 and 1997. Their analysis showed that outbreaks in provinces surrounding Bangkok were either synchronous or lag behind Bangkok, which indicated a repeating, spatial-temporal wave emanating from the city. The researchers do not know exactly why the wave occurs, but they believe it is related to the movement of people. Bangkok is heavily populated and it is the cultural and economic center of Thailand.

"Disease surveillance and control in Bangkok may help surrounding regions prepare for future outbreaks of dengue fever. Our results suggest that high priority should be placed on surveillance and control systems in urban areas of Southeast Asia," said Donald S. Burke, MD, co-author of the study and professor of International Health at the School of Public Health.

###

"Traveling waves in the occurrence of dengue hemorrhagic fever in Thailand" was written by Derek A.T. Cummings, Rafael A. Irizarry, Norden E. Huang, Timothy P. Endy, Ananda Nisalak, Kummuan Ungchusak and Donald S. Burke.

Research was supported by grants from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Joint Program on Climate Variability and Human Health and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School Of Public Health. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School Of Public Health. "Thailand Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Epidemics Spread In Waves Emanating From Bangkok." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 January 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/01/040122083820.htm>.
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School Of Public Health. (2004, January 22). Thailand Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Epidemics Spread In Waves Emanating From Bangkok. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 28, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/01/040122083820.htm
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School Of Public Health. "Thailand Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Epidemics Spread In Waves Emanating From Bangkok." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/01/040122083820.htm (accessed February 28, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, February 28, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Could a $34 Smartphone Device Improve HIV Diagnosis in Africa?

Could a $34 Smartphone Device Improve HIV Diagnosis in Africa?

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Feb. 27, 2015) A dongle that plugs into a Smartphone mimics a lab-based blood test for HIV and syphilis and can detect the diseases in 15 minutes, say researchers. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor Says Head Transplants Possible Within Two Years

Doctor Says Head Transplants Possible Within Two Years

Buzz60 (Feb. 27, 2015) An Italian doctor is saying he could stick someone&apos;s head onto someone else&apos;s body. Patrick Jones (@Patrick_E_Jones) reports. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Your Dentist Could Help Screen You For Diabetes

How Your Dentist Could Help Screen You For Diabetes

Newsy (Feb. 27, 2015) A new study from researchers at New York University suggests dentists could soon use blood samples taken from patients&apos; mouths to test for diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Best Tips to Makeover Your Health

The Best Tips to Makeover Your Health

Buzz60 (Feb. 27, 2015) If you&apos;re looking to boost your health this season, there are a few quick and easy steps to prompt you for success. Krystin Goodwin (@Krystingoodwin) has the best tips to give your health a makeover this spring! Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins