Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Fish Species Discovered In Midwestern River

Date:
March 8, 2004
Source:
Saint Louis University Health Sciences Center
Summary:
Think everything is known about America's biodiversity? Think again, says Saint Louis University biologist Richard Mayden, Ph.D. The chairman of SLU's biology department, Mayden has discovered a new species of fish, not in the depths of the tropics, but in the "wilds" of western Tennessee.

Think everything is known about America's biodiversity? Think again, says Saint Louis University biologist Richard Mayden, Ph.D. The chairman of SLU's biology department, Mayden has discovered a new species of fish, not in the depths of the tropics, but in the "wilds" of western Tennessee.

Mayden, along with his colleague and former doctoral student Steven Powers, Ph.D., of Reinhardt College in Georgia, recently discovered the Chickasaw darter, Etheostoma cervus, in the Forked Deer River, which is about an hour and a half northeast of Memphis.

"Most people think that basically everything is known about the biodiversity of the United States," Mayden said. "I beg to differ."

Having already discovered and described 10 previously unknown species from rivers in North America and working on another 30 descriptions of new species, Mayden said current predictions of biodiversity are underestimated.

Some people might assume that this new fish must be cryptically colored or not too flashy, helping it escape the notice of naturalists. That's hardly the case, Mayden said.

"This species is spectacularly colorful, especially the males during their breeding season," he said.

But how did this striking fish remain undiscovered? Mayden said one of the main reasons is that researchers mostly are looking elsewhere. That's where the funding is too, with most agencies supporting efforts to inventory tropical regions or areas under high risk of being lost.

"The reality is that there is a heck of a lot of biodiversity that has yet to be discovered in this country," Mayden said. "Even people in inner cities are living among fish species that haven't been described or discovered by scientists."

Mayden added that the newly discovered Chickasaw darter, like many other small stream fish, is endangered in its native habitat and should be considered for state and federal protection. The new species was described in the last edition of the peer-reviewed journal "Copeia,"

World-renowned artist Joseph R. Tomelleri illustrated the new fish for Mayden using specialized techniques with color pencil. Tomelleri has illustrated 700 color images of freshwater fish in Mayden's upcoming book on the Fishes of Alabama by Smithsonian Institution Press. More of Tomelleri's illustrations can be viewed online at http://www.americanfishes.com.

Saint Louis University is a Jesuit, Catholic university ranked among the top research institutions in the nation. The University fosters the intellectual and character development of 11,000 students on campuses in St. Louis and Madrid, Spain. Founded in 1818, it is the oldest university west of the Mississippi and the second oldest Jesuit university in the United States. Through teaching, research, health care and community service, Saint Louis University is the place where knowledge touches lives. Learn more about SLU at http://www.slu.edu.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Saint Louis University Health Sciences Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Saint Louis University Health Sciences Center. "New Fish Species Discovered In Midwestern River." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 March 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/03/040308072706.htm>.
Saint Louis University Health Sciences Center. (2004, March 8). New Fish Species Discovered In Midwestern River. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/03/040308072706.htm
Saint Louis University Health Sciences Center. "New Fish Species Discovered In Midwestern River." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/03/040308072706.htm (accessed April 19, 2014).

Share This



More Plants & Animals News

Saturday, April 19, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Vermont Goat Meat Gives Refugees Taste of Home

Vermont Goat Meat Gives Refugees Taste of Home

AP (Apr. 18, 2014) — Dairy farmers and ethnic groups in Vermont are both benefiting from a unique collaborative effort that's feeding a growing need for fresh and affordable goat meat. (April 18) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
First Ever 'Female Penis' Discovered In Animal Kingdom

First Ever 'Female Penis' Discovered In Animal Kingdom

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) — Not only are these newly discovered bugs' sex organs reversed, but they also mate for up to 70 hours. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) — A new report shows rates of two foodborne infections increased in the U.S. in recent years, while salmonella actually dropped 9 percent. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Great British Farmland Boom

The Great British Farmland Boom

Reuters - Business Video Online (Apr. 17, 2014) — Britain's troubled Co-operative Group is preparing to cash in on nearly 18,000 acres of farmland in one of the biggest UK land sales in decades. As Ivor Bennett reports, the market timing couldn't be better, with farmland prices soaring over 270 percent in the last 10 years. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins