Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Neurosurgeons Assessing Spinal Cord Stimulator In Treatment Of Chronic Pain

Date:
June 3, 2004
Source:
University Of Illinois At Chicago
Summary:
A neurosurgeon at the University of Illinois at Chicago is assessing how well an implanted electronic device that stimulates nerve fibers in the spinal cord relieves chronic pain.

A neurosurgeon at the University of Illinois at Chicago is assessing how well an implanted electronic device that stimulates nerve fibers in the spinal cord relieves chronic pain.

The device, made by Advanced Neuromodulation Systems, is already approved by the Food and Drug Administration, but is undergoing further evaluation at several sites throughout the United States for potential marketing overseas.

"Coping with chronic pain is one of life's greatest challenges," said Dr. Konstantin Slavin, assistant professor of neurosurgery at the UIC College of Medicine.

More than 50 million Americans suffer from chronic pain, Slavin said, and many of them become partially or totally disabled. "That's why it is important to identify effective methods for treating intractable pain, and document the extent to which these treatments can improve patients' quality of life."

Functioning like a cardiac pacemaker, which uses electrical impulses to regulate the heartbeat, the Genesis(TM) Implantable Pulse Generator transmits low-level electrical impulses to the spinal cord to modify pain signals. The electrical impulses alter messages before they reach the brain, replacing the pain signals with what patients describe as a tingling sensation.

The system, which is used to treat chronic pain in the trunk or limbs, consists of a pulse generator and leads. It is implanted during a surgical procedure that can be brief and minimally invasive, depending on the type of leads emplaced.

The leads are positioned in the space above the spinal cord, called the epidural space, with electrodes at the end of the leads in contact with the specific nerve fibers extending from the spinal cord that are the source of the patient's pain.

The pulse generator is the power source, consisting of a battery and related electronics housed in a single metal container that is about the size of a silver dollar. It is placed just under the skin in a practical location determined by the physician and patient, usually on the abdomen or just below the beltline on the back.

Patients use an external device -- a remote control -- to turn the stimulator on and off. They can increase or decrease the pulse transmitted to the nerve fibers to match their current activity or pain level.

Spinal cord stimulation is not a cure, so it doesn't usually eliminate all sensations of pain, but it can lessen the intensity of the pain, Slavin said, decreasing the need for medication and allowing patients to resume more normal activities.

The device can be used around the clock, if necessary, or only as needed during the day or night.

A total of 15 patients will be involved in the study at UIC, with up to 50 patients enrolled at five sites nationwide. Before the pulse generator is implanted and again one month, three months and six months after the surgery, participants will be asked to fill out a questionnaire that reviews medical history, pain symptoms and characteristics, pain location and quality of life.

Patients interested in obtaining more information about the study may call 800-597-5970 and ask for the research division.

###

For more information about the UIC College of Medicine, visit http://www.uic.edu/depts/mcam/.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Illinois At Chicago. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Illinois At Chicago. "Neurosurgeons Assessing Spinal Cord Stimulator In Treatment Of Chronic Pain." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 June 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/06/040603064249.htm>.
University Of Illinois At Chicago. (2004, June 3). Neurosurgeons Assessing Spinal Cord Stimulator In Treatment Of Chronic Pain. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 3, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/06/040603064249.htm
University Of Illinois At Chicago. "Neurosurgeons Assessing Spinal Cord Stimulator In Treatment Of Chronic Pain." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/06/040603064249.htm (accessed September 3, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Snack Attack: Study Says Action Movies Make You Snack More

Snack Attack: Study Says Action Movies Make You Snack More

Newsy (Sep. 2, 2014) You're more likely to gain weight while watching action flicks than you are watching other types of programming, says a new study published in JAMA. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

Newsy (Sep. 2, 2014) The U.N. says the problem is two-fold — quarantine zones and travel restrictions are limiting the movement of both people and food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctors Fear They're Losing Battle Against Ebola

Doctors Fear They're Losing Battle Against Ebola

AP (Sep. 2, 2014) As a third American missionary is confirmed to have contracted Ebola in Liberia, doctors on the ground in West Africa fear they're losing the battle against the outbreak. (Sept. 2) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Tech Giants Bet on 3D Headsets for Gaming, Healthcare

Tech Giants Bet on 3D Headsets for Gaming, Healthcare

AFP (Sep. 2, 2014) When Facebook acquired the virtual reality hardware developer Oculus VR in March for $2 billion, CEO Mark Zuckerberg hailed the firm's technology as "a new communication platform." Duration: 02:24 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins