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Techniques For Making Barbie Dolls Can Improve Health Care

Date:
October 22, 2004
Source:
Institute For Operations Research And The Management Sciences
Summary:
Bowing to crushing increases in the cost of delivering medical services to Americans, the troubled health care system will begin to adopt operations research and other techniques that have proven successful in the relatively unfashionable manufacturing sector, predicts a leading expert.

Bowing to crushing increases in the cost of delivering medical services to Americans, the troubled health care system will begin to adopt operations research and other techniques that have proven successful in the relatively unfashionable manufacturing sector, predicts a leading expert.

"By the end of the decade, the health care industry will realize that operations research, IT, and other advanced techniques that manufacturers have been using for 15 years to reduce the cost of making items like toys and computer chips will also improve health care delivery," said operations researcher William P. Pierskalla, the John E. Anderson Professor and former dean of the Anderson School at UCLA. "These techniques offer major cost, quality, and access improvements to the healthcare system."

The remarks are scheduled to be delivered at the annual meeting of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS®) on Sunday, October 24 at 11:40 AM in the Plaza Building Ballroom A of the Adams Mark Hotel in Denver.

"There's a new alignment of the stars, and these stars are embracing operations research and information technologies that can bring major cost, quality, and access improvements," he says.

Prof. Pierskalla sees the trend of greater encouragement for the use of operations research and similar techniques coming from business groups like the Business Roundtable, Leapfrog Group, and National Association of Manufacturers; governmental agencies like the National Science Foundation; non-governmental organizations like the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations; and advocates for the elderly like AARP.

Operations research, known as the "Science of Better," is the discipline of applying advanced analytical methods to help make better decisions.

Mathematical modeling tools characteristic of operations research that are found in manufacturing have already begun finding their way into delivering medical care, maintaining health, arranging for care, and administrative processes, he said. He cited several examples.

* The use of supply chain management techniques to improve the way that blood banks collect blood from donors and deliver units to hospitals.

* An increasing number of hospitals adopting capacity planning techniques used in assembly lines.

* The use of scheduling systems used by service providers like Sears to reduce the delay in physician and clinic waiting rooms.

* The application of techniques for situating warehouses to improve the way that ambulances are located in anticipation of emergency calls.

Prof. Pierskalla said that operations research offers potential for improvement not only at the healthcare administrative level but also at the clinical level with decision support systems for diagnosis, therapy, prevention, disease management, and progressive care.

The improvements ahead, cautioned Prof. Pierskalla, must be accompanied by research that leads to better data mining; more powerful algorithms; better decision analysis tools; better outcome measures; and integrated models of patient-centered supply and delivery chains in the home, outpatient center, hospital, and long-term care facility.

###

[Two other operations research papers on improving health care will be presented at the INFORMS annual meeting. IT's Increasing Impact on Health Care by Kevin Leonard, University of Toronto, and Dean Sittig, Director, Applied Research in Med Informatics, Kaiser Permanente (Sunday, October 24, 1:30 – 3:00 PM, Plaza Building -Room 3304); and Making Better Decisions to Prevent Breast Cancer by Elissa Ozanne, Harvard Medical School and Laura Esserman, University of California San Francisco Medical Center (Sunday, October 24, 1:30 – 3:00 PM, Plaza Building -Directors Row H).]

INFORMS is holding its annual meeting in Denver from Sunday, October 24 to Wednesday, October 27 at the Adams Mark Hotel. The meeting includes sessions that apply to numerous fields, including airlines, health care, the military, information technology, energy, transportation, marketing, and e-commerce. More than 2,000 papers are scheduled to be delivered. The General Chair of the meeting is Prof. Manuel Laguna, University of Colorado Boulder, Leeds School of Business.

Additional information about the conference is at http://www.informs.org/Conf/Denver2004 and http://www.informs.org/Press. Sponsors include, from the Denver area Coors, Jeppesen, and the University of Colorado at Boulder, Leeds School of Business; and IBM Research and ILOG.

The Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS®) is an international scientific society with 10,000 members, including Nobel Prize laureates, dedicated to applying scientific methods to help improve decision-making, management, and operations. Members of INFORMS work in business, government, and academia. They are represented in fields as diverse as airlines, health care, law enforcement, the military, financial engineering, and telecommunications. The INFORMS website is www.informs.org. More information about operations research is at http://www.scienceofbetter.org.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Institute For Operations Research And The Management Sciences. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Institute For Operations Research And The Management Sciences. "Techniques For Making Barbie Dolls Can Improve Health Care." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 October 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/10/041022103830.htm>.
Institute For Operations Research And The Management Sciences. (2004, October 22). Techniques For Making Barbie Dolls Can Improve Health Care. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/10/041022103830.htm
Institute For Operations Research And The Management Sciences. "Techniques For Making Barbie Dolls Can Improve Health Care." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/10/041022103830.htm (accessed August 1, 2014).

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