Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Mayo Clinic Radiation Oncologists Use Respiratory Gating Technology To Target Tumors

Date:
December 2, 2004
Source:
Mayo Clinic
Summary:
Radiation oncologists at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., are using respiratory gating technology to synchronize delivery of radiation with the patient's own respiratory cycle. The technique allows treatment with a high dose of radiation to cancerous tumors while sparing a larger volume of healthy tissue.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla., Nov. 12, 2004 -- Radiation oncologists at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., are using respiratory gating technology to synchronize delivery of radiation with the patient's own respiratory cycle. The technique allows treatment with a high dose of radiation to cancerous tumors while sparing a larger volume of healthy tissue.

With each breath, organs in the chest and upper abdomen move. A tumor in a person's lung, liver or breast may move within a 2-inch range between inhalation and exhalation. When doctors attack the tumor with external radiation, they must treat healthy tissue as well in order to adequately include the tumor if the radiation beam is on during the entire respiratory cycle.

"There is a correlation between the increased dose of radiation to normal tissue and an increased risk of complications," says Mayo Clinic radiation oncologist Dr. Laura Vallow. "We are trying to minimize the dose of radiation delivered to normal tissue while continuing to treat all of the disease."

Respiratory gating is the latest advance in radiation oncology to permit a reduction in the volume of normal tissue treated. Using a multislice, four-dimensional CT scanner (the fourth dimension is time) and computers capable of storing and manipulating the necessary 1,500 CT images, physicians measure the patient's range of motion during respiration, decide whether respiratory gating is appropriate and customize the treatment field to the patient. During actual treatment, the radiation beam is continuously turned on and off to synchronize delivery of radiation during the optimal point of the patient's respiration cycle.

"This is not perfect, because the way you breathe today and the way you breathe tomorrow are not necessarily the same," says Mayo Clinic medical physicist Christopher Serago, Ph.D. "If you try to breath like a machine, you can't do it, but this is a better approximation than we've ever had before."

It's usually necessary to treat some margin of healthy tissue with radiation for two reasons. The first is to include microscopic cancer cells not visible on imaging studies. The second is to allow for variables such as patient movement, including breathing, during treatment. "Respiration is hard to predict from patient to patient," Serago says. "In the past if you wanted to be very conservative, you might put up to a 3-centimeter margin around the tumor to account for respiratory motion. With gating, the treatment margin may be reduced and customized to the individual patient."

Drs. Serago and Vallow say that patients with breast, lung, liver, pancreas and possibly kidney cancer will be evaluated to see if respiratory gating can be used in their radiation therapy. In addition, they say respiratory gating technology will enable radiosurgery beyond intracranial application. This type of surgery uses a single powerful dose of tumor-killing radiation, which is not possible without extreme accuracy.

-- 30 --

Mayo Clinic is a multispecialty medical clinic in Jacksonville, Fla. The staff includes 328 physicians working in more than 40 specialties to provide diagnosis, treatment and surgery. Patients who need hospitalization are admitted to nearby St. Luke's Hospital, a 289-bed Mayo facility. Mayo Clinics also are located in Rochester, Minn., and Scottsdale, Ariz. Visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/news for all the news from Mayo Clinic.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Mayo Clinic. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Mayo Clinic. "Mayo Clinic Radiation Oncologists Use Respiratory Gating Technology To Target Tumors." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 December 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/11/041123163459.htm>.
Mayo Clinic. (2004, December 2). Mayo Clinic Radiation Oncologists Use Respiratory Gating Technology To Target Tumors. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/11/041123163459.htm
Mayo Clinic. "Mayo Clinic Radiation Oncologists Use Respiratory Gating Technology To Target Tumors." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/11/041123163459.htm (accessed July 23, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law

Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law

AP (July 22, 2014) Two federal appeals courts issued conflicting rulings Tuesday on the legality of the federally-run healthcare exchange that operates in 36 states. (July 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The new sci-fi thriller "Lucy" is making people question whether we really use all our brainpower. But, as scientists have insisted for years, we do. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Find New Way To Make Human Platelets

Scientists Find New Way To Make Human Platelets

Newsy (July 22, 2014) Boston scientists have discovered a new way to create fully functioning human platelets using a bioreactor and human stem cells. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

TheStreet (July 21, 2014) New research shows Gilead Science's drug Sovaldi helps in curing hepatitis C in those who suffer from HIV. In a medical study, the combination of Gilead's Hep C drug with anti-viral drug Ribavirin cured 76% of HIV-positive patients suffering from the most common hepatitis C strain. Hepatitis C and related complications have been a top cause of death in HIV-positive patients. Typical medication used to treat the disease, including interferon proteins, tended to react badly with HIV drugs. However, Sovaldi's %1,000-a-pill price tag could limit the number of patients able to access the treatment. TheStreet's Keris Lahiff reports from New York. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins