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NIH Halts Use Of COX-2 Inhibitor In Large Cancer Prevention Trial

Date:
December 20, 2004
Source:
National Institutes Of Health
Summary:
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced that it has suspended the use of COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib (Celebrex™ Pfizer, Inc.) for all participants in a large colorectal cancer prevention clinical trial conducted by the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

December 17, 2004 -- The National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced today that it has suspended the use of COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib (Celebrex™ Pfizer, Inc.) for all participants in a large colorectal cancer prevention clinical trial conducted by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The study, called the Adenoma Prevention with Celecoxib (APC) trial, was stopped because analysis by an independent Data Safety and Monitoring Board (DSMB) showed a 2.5-fold increased risk of major fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events for participants taking the drug compared to those on a placebo.

Additional cardiovascular expertise was added to the safety monitoring committees at the request of the Steering Committees for this trial after a September 2004 report that the COX-2 inhibitor rofecoxib (Vioxx™) caused a two-fold increased risk of cardiovascular toxicities in a trial to prevent adenomas. The APC is a study of more than 2,000 people who have had a precancerous growth (adenomatous polyp) removed. They were randomized to take either 200 mg of celecoxib twice a day, 400 mg of celecoxib twice a day, or a placebo for three years. The trial began in early 2000 and is scheduled to have been completed by Spring 2005.

Investigators at the 100 sites in the APC trial located primarily in the United States, with a few additional sites in the United Kingdom, Australia, and Canada, have been instructed to immediately suspend study drug use for all participants on the trial, although the participants will remain under observation for the planned remainder of the study.

“Data from the report on rofecoxib (Vioxx™) informed us of the need to focus on specific cardiovascular issues, and our Institutes brought in the experts to do so," said Elias A. Zerhouni, M.D., NIH Director. “Our overwhelming commitment is to advance the health and to protect the safety of participants in clinical trials. We are examining the use of these agents in all NIH-sponsored clinical studies. In addition, we are working closely with our colleagues at FDA to ensure that the public has the information they need to make informed decisions about the use of this class of drug.”

“The rigor of our clinical trials system has allowed us to find this problem,” said NCI Director Andrew C. von Eschenbach, M.D. “We have a strong system that provides us with the opportunity to both find ways to effectively treat and prevent disease and to do so in a way that protects the lives and safety of the participants.”

NIH sponsors over 40 studies using celecoxib for the prevention and treatment of cancer, dementia and other diseases. In light of these new findings, NIH Director Zerhouni requested:

* a full review of all NIH-supported studies involving this class of drug. * NIH Institutes to inform the principal investigators for all of these studies and will ask them to communicate directly with their study participants and explain the risks and benefits * NIH to ask each investigator to inform us of their plan to analyze their data in light of the information * the Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) for all related trials to assess the new information and to conduct a safety review as well

The NIH comprises the Office of the Director and 27 Institutes and Centers. The Office of the Director is the central office at NIH, and is responsible for setting policy for NIH and for planning, managing, and coordinating the programs and activities of all the NIH components. The NIH, the Nation's medical research agency, is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

###

Related information: Questions and Answers regarding "NIH Halts Use of COX-2 Inhibitor in Large Cancer Prevention Trial" -- http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/dec2004/od-17Q&A.htm


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Institutes Of Health. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

National Institutes Of Health. "NIH Halts Use Of COX-2 Inhibitor In Large Cancer Prevention Trial." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 December 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/12/041219115114.htm>.
National Institutes Of Health. (2004, December 20). NIH Halts Use Of COX-2 Inhibitor In Large Cancer Prevention Trial. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/12/041219115114.htm
National Institutes Of Health. "NIH Halts Use Of COX-2 Inhibitor In Large Cancer Prevention Trial." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/12/041219115114.htm (accessed September 22, 2014).

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