Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

INEEL-designed System Assists Army With Chemical Weapon Destruction

Date:
December 30, 2004
Source:
Idaho National Engineering And Environmental Laboratory
Summary:
The United States is moving forward decisively on its commitment to destroy thousands of chemical munitions, thanks in part, to the efforts of engineers, scientists and technicians at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory.

The United States is moving forward decisively on its commitment to destroy thousands of chemical munitions, thanks in part, to the efforts of engineers, scientists and technicians at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory.

Related Articles


Earlier this year, the U.S. Army’s Technical Escort Unit at the Pine Bluff Arsenal, Pine Bluff, Ark., began operations to assess and characterize recovered chemical munitions stored at the Arsenal. Due to the variety of non-stockpile chemical material, the technicians must first confirm the contents of drums and individual munitions before they can select the treatment and disposal alternative that best protects the environment, and the health and safety of workers and the public.

The INEEL-designed and -fabricated Munitions Assessment System is a one-of-a-kind, series of stainless steel vapor confinement and support modules that assists the Army with the assessment of the chemical warfare materiel, some of which dates back to World War I.

The Munitions Assessment System is designed to process drums containing multiple chemical munitions. A drum is delivered to the unpack/repackage room via an inlet airlock. Once inside, technicians in protective suits open the drum and examine and assess each item before repackaging.

The system also includes several INEEL-developed technologies. The digital radiography and computed tomography system generates detailed X-rays and “CAT scans” of each munition and the portable isotopic neutron spectroscopy system, or PINS, identifies the chemical fill the munition may contain.

Operations began with the evaluation of drums containing Chemical Agent Identification Sets, which were produced by the Army from 1928 to 1969. These sets are glass ampules or bottles that contain small amounts of both neat and dilute chemical agents, and were used to train soldiers in the identification of possible chemical weapons.

INEEL engineers have designed and built several mobile systems for the U.S. Army to assess recovered chemical weapons materiel found in the field, such as the bomblets recently discovered at Rocky Mountain Arsenal in Colorado, or the World War I weapons found in suburban Washington, D.C. The Pine Bluff Arsenal facility-based “production line” system called for some special requirements.

“There were really two big pieces to this project,” said Robert McMorland, INEEL’s Munitions Assessment System project manager. “The first part is the modules. We moved munition-handling operations into an engineered controls environment. The second part, and equally important, is all of the support systems.”

INEEL’s engineering team designed heating/ventilation/air conditioning, electrical, breathing air, vacuum collection, personnel decontamination systems and every knob and tool to accommodate the heavily garbed technicians who wear as much as three sets of gloves and have limited mobility.

The U.S. Army Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel Program has provided safe storage and monitoring of non-stockpile chemical weapons for more than 45 years. They lead the nation in the development and use of advanced technology to safely eliminate America’s non-stockpile chemical material. The INEEL has been a significant contributor in this important mission.

The INEEL is a science-based, applied engineering national laboratory dedicated to supporting the U.S. Department of Energy's missions in energy, national security, science and environmental research. The INEEL is operated for the DOE by Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Idaho National Engineering And Environmental Laboratory. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Idaho National Engineering And Environmental Laboratory. "INEEL-designed System Assists Army With Chemical Weapon Destruction." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 December 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/12/041219182850.htm>.
Idaho National Engineering And Environmental Laboratory. (2004, December 30). INEEL-designed System Assists Army With Chemical Weapon Destruction. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/12/041219182850.htm
Idaho National Engineering And Environmental Laboratory. "INEEL-designed System Assists Army With Chemical Weapon Destruction." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/12/041219182850.htm (accessed January 27, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Matter & Energy News

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Cablevision Enters Wi-Fi Phone Fray

Cablevision Enters Wi-Fi Phone Fray

Reuters - Business Video Online (Jan. 26, 2015) The entry by Cablevision and Google could intensify the already heated price wars for mobile phone service. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hector the Robot Mimics a Giant Stick Insect

Hector the Robot Mimics a Giant Stick Insect

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Jan. 26, 2015) A robot based on a stick insect can navigate difficult terrain autonomously and adapt to its surroundings. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Model Flying, Walking Drone After Vampire Bats

Scientists Model Flying, Walking Drone After Vampire Bats

Buzz60 (Jan. 26, 2015) Swiss scientists build a new drone that can both fly and walk, modeling it after the movements of common vampire bats. Jen Markham (@jenmarkham) has the story. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obama's Wildlife Plan Renews Alaska Drilling Debate

Obama's Wildlife Plan Renews Alaska Drilling Debate

Newsy (Jan. 26, 2015) President Obama&apos;s proposal aims to protect more land in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, but so far, all that&apos;s materialized is a war of words. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

    Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



    Save/Print:
    Share:

    Free Subscriptions


    Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

    Get Social & Mobile


    Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

    Have Feedback?


    Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
    Mobile: iPhone Android Web
    Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
    Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
    Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins