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Convention Center Implosion Site For Radio Experiments

Date:
January 6, 2005
Source:
National Institute Of Standards And Technology (NIST)
Summary:
Experiments aimed at improving emergency radio communications were performed by researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) at the old Washington Convention Center in downtown Washington, D.C., before, during and after its implosion on Dec. 18, 2004.

NIST electrical engineers Chris Holloway and Galen Koepke place transmitters in a protected air vent at the old Washington Convention Center prior to the implosion of the building.
Credit: Photo by Gail Porter/NIST

Experiments aimed at improving emergency radio communications were performed by researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) at the old Washington Convention Center in downtown Washington, D.C., before, during and after its implosion on Dec. 18, 2004.

The NIST work, which supports public safety programs of the U.S. departments of Homeland Security and Justice, is intended to help improve the communications capabilities of first responders. First responders who rely on radio communications often lose signals in shielded or complex environments such as the basements or elevator shafts of buildings. It also is very difficult to detect radio signals through the dense rubble of a building that has collapsed as a result of a natural disaster or terrorist attack.

To simulate disaster environments, NIST is using real-world “laboratories”—buildings that are scheduled to be imploded as part of construction and recycling projects. The NIST team placed a set of about 25 battery-operated transmitters at various locations in the old Washington Convention Center prior to demolition. The transmitters emitted signals near the frequency bands used by emergency personnel and mobile telephones. Scientists monitored and mapped the strength of signals sent by the transmitters to receivers outside the building before, during and after the implosion.

To detect the weak signals, the researchers used a variety of techniques, including connecting radio receivers to metal debris in the rubble as improvised antennas and converting radio signals to visual images like Morse code (see image below). NIST researchers hope to develop reliable, cost-effective tools that can be retrofitted to existing radio systems to assist emergency personnel in locating and perhaps communicating with rescuers and other survivors trapped inside a collapsed building.

For more information, see http://www.nist.gov/public_affairs/releases/demolition_dcconv.htm.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Institute Of Standards And Technology (NIST). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

National Institute Of Standards And Technology (NIST). "Convention Center Implosion Site For Radio Experiments." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 January 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050106110323.htm>.
National Institute Of Standards And Technology (NIST). (2005, January 6). Convention Center Implosion Site For Radio Experiments. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050106110323.htm
National Institute Of Standards And Technology (NIST). "Convention Center Implosion Site For Radio Experiments." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050106110323.htm (accessed July 22, 2014).

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