Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Convention Center Implosion Site For Radio Experiments

Date:
January 6, 2005
Source:
National Institute Of Standards And Technology (NIST)
Summary:
Experiments aimed at improving emergency radio communications were performed by researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) at the old Washington Convention Center in downtown Washington, D.C., before, during and after its implosion on Dec. 18, 2004.

NIST electrical engineers Chris Holloway and Galen Koepke place transmitters in a protected air vent at the old Washington Convention Center prior to the implosion of the building.
Credit: Photo by Gail Porter/NIST

Experiments aimed at improving emergency radio communications were performed by researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) at the old Washington Convention Center in downtown Washington, D.C., before, during and after its implosion on Dec. 18, 2004.

The NIST work, which supports public safety programs of the U.S. departments of Homeland Security and Justice, is intended to help improve the communications capabilities of first responders. First responders who rely on radio communications often lose signals in shielded or complex environments such as the basements or elevator shafts of buildings. It also is very difficult to detect radio signals through the dense rubble of a building that has collapsed as a result of a natural disaster or terrorist attack.

To simulate disaster environments, NIST is using real-world “laboratories”—buildings that are scheduled to be imploded as part of construction and recycling projects. The NIST team placed a set of about 25 battery-operated transmitters at various locations in the old Washington Convention Center prior to demolition. The transmitters emitted signals near the frequency bands used by emergency personnel and mobile telephones. Scientists monitored and mapped the strength of signals sent by the transmitters to receivers outside the building before, during and after the implosion.

To detect the weak signals, the researchers used a variety of techniques, including connecting radio receivers to metal debris in the rubble as improvised antennas and converting radio signals to visual images like Morse code (see image below). NIST researchers hope to develop reliable, cost-effective tools that can be retrofitted to existing radio systems to assist emergency personnel in locating and perhaps communicating with rescuers and other survivors trapped inside a collapsed building.

For more information, see http://www.nist.gov/public_affairs/releases/demolition_dcconv.htm.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Institute Of Standards And Technology (NIST). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

National Institute Of Standards And Technology (NIST). "Convention Center Implosion Site For Radio Experiments." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 January 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050106110323.htm>.
National Institute Of Standards And Technology (NIST). (2005, January 6). Convention Center Implosion Site For Radio Experiments. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050106110323.htm
National Institute Of Standards And Technology (NIST). "Convention Center Implosion Site For Radio Experiments." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050106110323.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Japan Looks To Faster Future As Bullet Train Turns 50

Japan Looks To Faster Future As Bullet Train Turns 50

Newsy (Oct. 1, 2014) Japan's bullet train turns 50 Wednesday. Here's a look at how it's changed over half a century — and the changes it's inspired globally. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
US Police Put Body Cameras to the Test

US Police Put Body Cameras to the Test

AFP (Oct. 1, 2014) Police body cameras are gradually being rolled out across the US, with interest surging after the fatal police shooting in August of an unarmed black teenager. Duration: 02:18 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Japan Celebrates 'bullet Train' Anniversary

Raw: Japan Celebrates 'bullet Train' Anniversary

AP (Oct. 1, 2014) A ceremony marking 50 years since Japan launched its Shinkansen bullet train was held on Wednesday in Tokyo. The latest model can travel from Tokyo to Osaka, a distance of 319 miles, in two hours and 25 minutes. (Oct. 1) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robotic Hair Restoration

Robotic Hair Restoration

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) A new robotic procedure is changing the way we transplant hair. The ARTAS robot leaves no linear scarring and provides more natural results. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins