Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Guideline: Corticosteroids Recommended For Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

Date:
January 21, 2005
Source:
American Academy Of Neurology
Summary:
Corticosteroids can be beneficial in the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and can be offered as a treatment option, according to the American Academy of Neurology and the Child Neurology Society in a new practice guideline published in the January 11 issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

ST. PAUL, Minn. – Corticosteroids can be beneficial in the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and can be offered as a treatment option, according to the American Academy of Neurology and the Child Neurology Society in a new practice guideline published in the January 11 issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Related Articles


Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a genetic disorder linked to the X-chromosome. It is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in children and occurs when the protein dystrophin is missing. This causes a gradual breakdown of muscles and a decline in muscle strength. Duchenne muscular dystrophy mainly affects boys. An estimated one in 3,500 males worldwide has the disorder, and each year approximately 400 boys in the United States are born with it. Symptoms usually appear between ages two and five and include frequent falls, large calf muscles, and difficulty running, jumping, and getting up. There is no cure.

The guideline authors reviewed all available research for the use of corticosteroids in the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Corticosteroids are man-made drugs that are similar to the body's hormone cortisone. Two corticosteroids, prednisone and deflazacort, were found to slow the rate of muscle deterioration, and are recommended as potential treatments to minimize the effect of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

Prednisone was found to help muscle strength and function and should be offered as a treatment option. Deflazacort, a drug similar to prednisone, is also recommended as a treatment option but is not available in the United States at this time.

"Corticosteroids are the only effective drugs in providing improvements in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy," said lead author Richard T. Moxley III, MD, of the University of Rochester in Rochester, N.Y.

The guideline authors caution that an offer of treatment with corticosteroids should include a balanced discussion of potential benefits and risks. Possible side effects of corticosteroid therapy should be closely monitored by a physician. Side effects can include weight gain, cushingoid appearance (a rounded face), cataracts, short stature, acne, excessive hair growth, gastrointestinal symptoms, and behavioral changes. A nutrition plan and exercise program may prevent some of these side effects.

"If the side effects outweigh the benefits, it is recommended to lower the dose of the drug," said Moxley. "If the dose is decreased, the level of improvement in muscle strength and function may not be as great."

Other treatments for Duchenne muscular dystrophy include physical therapy to reduce muscle tightening, orthopedic support devices, and corrective orthopedic surgery to improve the ability to function.

Complete guidelines, a summary for physicians, and a version for patients and their families will be available on January 11 at http://www.aan.com/professionals/practice/guideline/index.cfm.

###

The American Academy of Neurology, an association of more than 18,000 neurologists and neuroscience professionals, is dedicated to improving patient care through education and research. A neurologist is a doctor with specialized training in diagnosing, treating and managing disorders of the brain and nervous system such as Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, muscular dystrophy, and stroke.

For more information about the American Academy of Neurology, visit its Website at http://www.aan.com.

The Child Neurology Society is an association of 1,400 pediatric neurologists worldwide devoted to fostering the discipline of child neurology and promoting the optimal care and welfare of children with neurological and neurodevelopmental disorders. For more information about the Child Neurology Society, visit http://www.childneurologysociety.org.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Academy Of Neurology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Academy Of Neurology. "New Guideline: Corticosteroids Recommended For Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 January 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050111115101.htm>.
American Academy Of Neurology. (2005, January 21). New Guideline: Corticosteroids Recommended For Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050111115101.htm
American Academy Of Neurology. "New Guideline: Corticosteroids Recommended For Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050111115101.htm (accessed November 27, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) Researchers in the United States are preparing to discover whether a drug commonly used in human organ transplants can extend the lifespan and health quality of pet dogs. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) Advances in prosthetics are making replacement body parts stronger and more lifelike than they’ve ever been. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) The US FDA is announcing new calorie rules on Tuesday that will require everywhere from theaters to vending machines to include calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) Need another reason to eat yogurt every day? Researchers now say it could reduce a person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins