Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Radio-frequency Technique For Knee Injuries

Date:
March 7, 2005
Source:
Elhuyar Fundazioa
Summary:
The application of a new technique for injuries of the cruciate ligament in the knee, involving the use of bipolar radio-frequency plus heat, has proved to be 90% effective in cases and shortens the recovery time of the patient.

The application of a new technique for injuries of the cruciate ligament in the knee, involving the use of bipolar radio-frequency plus heat, has proved to be 90% effective in cases and shortens the recovery time of the patient. This technique, carried out by specialists at the Navarre University Hospital Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, has received the National Prize for Research into Sports Medicine, awarded annually by the University of Oviedo. The awarded work, “Retraction of anterior cruciate ligament using bipolar radio-frequency”, was penned by five doctors at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery.

Related Articles


The prize-winning clinical research proposes the use of bipolar radio-frequency, plus the heat obtained thereof, to carry out retraction (tensing of the ligament); always when this is an ongoing process. These ligaments contain a lot of water and collagen fibres which shrink and tense on applying heat to them at a certain radio-frequency. The technique is carried out by arthroscopy, with specialised terminals, applying between 40 and 50 degrees of heat to the slack ligament. With this treatment, recuperation being much shorter and with a high percentage of probability of success, always when it is undertaken with the correct and exact procedures. Patients who suffer from a partial ligament injury and/or slack ligament can benefit from this surgical technique which tenses the ligament again and, over a short period of time – not more than three months - can return to sporting activity once again.

Project trials were carried out on thirty patients/sportspersons under controlled conditions at the Navarre University Hospital Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, in collaboration with the Radiology Service at the hospital. The patients were subjected to magnetic resonance studies over a period of at least year after the retraction. From these studies, satisfactory results were obtained in 90% of the patients. The remaining patients were able to benefit from more traditional treatment techniques, but with longer recuperation periods. It would appear to be the case that the technique is more effective with persons who practise sport regularly as a hobby, and in middle-aged patients and veteran sportspersons with knees somewhat deteriorated.

One of the most serious and common injuries is that of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), typical in football and skiing, but also in other sports where sudden turns, violent contacts and twists of the knee can take place. The rupture of this ligament is relatively frequent and, for professional sportspersons, may mean being out of competition sport for between six to eight months, with the social and economic repercussion that this entails. If the lesion is total – with a complete break of the ligament - the usual surgery has to be undertaken involving the graft from another ligament or tendon to replace the injured tissue. This has to be followed by long months of recovery until the new graft has acquired a suitable consistency and transforms into a new ACL.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Elhuyar Fundazioa. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Elhuyar Fundazioa. "New Radio-frequency Technique For Knee Injuries." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 March 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/02/050224123448.htm>.
Elhuyar Fundazioa. (2005, March 7). New Radio-frequency Technique For Knee Injuries. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/02/050224123448.htm
Elhuyar Fundazioa. "New Radio-frequency Technique For Knee Injuries." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/02/050224123448.htm (accessed October 25, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

Buzz60 (Oct. 24, 2014) IKEA is out with a new convertible desk that can convert from a sitting desk to a standing one with just the push of a button. Jen Markham explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

AFP (Oct. 24, 2014) A factory in China is busy making Ebola protective suits for healthcare workers and others fighting the spread of the virus. Duration: 00:38 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) The World Health Organization said on Friday that millions of doses of two experimental Ebola vaccines could be ready for use in 2015 and five more experimental vaccines would start being tested in March. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) An emergency room doctor who recently returned to the city after treating Ebola patients in West Africa has tested positive for the virus. He's quarantined in a hospital. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins