Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Oral Bacteria May Predict Pregnancy Outcomes

Date:
March 23, 2005
Source:
American Academy Of Periodontology
Summary:
Researchers from New York University found that certain bacteria from the mouth may be related to preterm delivery and low birthweight according to a study in the Journal of Periodontology (JOP).

Chicago – March 23, 2005 – Researchers from New York University found that certain bacteria from the mouth may be related to preterm delivery and low birthweight according to a study in the Journal of Periodontology (JOP).

Related Articles


It's been reported in the past that periodontal disease may be a factor in the occurrence of preterm low birthweight babies. Now it is believed that bacteria commonly found in dental plaque biofilms may also be related.

Researchers evaluated bacterial levels in the saliva of 297 women in their third trimester of pregnancy. They found that a higher salivary level of the bacteria called Actinomyces naeslundii Genospecies2 (A. naeslundii gsp2) is associated with low birth weight and preterm delivery, while higher levels of the bacteria Lactobacillus casei (L. casei) during pregnancy positively affected the birthweight."

"Our observation that A.naeslundii gsp2 reduced birthweight and preterm delivery fits well with the theory that oral bacteria and the molecules the body produces against them can enter the uterine environment through the blood stream and may influence the delivery process," explained Dr. Ananda P. Dasanayake, Department of Epidemiology and Health Promotion, New York University College of Dentistry. "Whereas the bacteria L.casei secretes acids that maintain the vaginal pH level below 4.5. This pH level has a protective effect and prevents the overgrowth of more bacteria, including those associated with bacterial vaginosis (a condition associated with preterm labor and deliver)."

"What's interesting is that the research shows that for each ten-fold increase in A. naeslundii gsp 2 levels, there was a 60 gram (0.13 pound) decline in birthweight and a 0.17 week decrease in gestational age. On the other hand, for one unit increase of L. casei levels there was a 42 gram increase (0.9 pounds) in birth weight and a 0.13 week increase in gestational age," said Vincent J. Iacono, DMD and president of the American Academy of Periodontology. "Future studies should evaluate both oral bacteria and bacteria that are not related to periodontal diseases to better understand this potential important link between periodontal status and prematurity."

This issue of the JOP included another study, Periodontal Diseases and the Risk of Preterm Birth and Low Birth Weight: A Meta-Analysis. Findings from this study indicate that periodontal diseases in the pregnant mother significantly increase the risk of subsequent preterm birth or low birth weight. Researchers feel it remains important to promote good oral hygiene during routine prenatal visits, but caution that more studies need to be conducted to further our understanding about the effects of periodontal treatment on preterm birth.

###

The American Academy of Periodontology is an 8,000-member association of dental professionals specializing in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases affecting the gums and supporting structures of the teeth and in the placement and maintenance of dental implants. Periodontics is one of nine dental specialties recognized by the American Dental Association.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Academy Of Periodontology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Academy Of Periodontology. "Oral Bacteria May Predict Pregnancy Outcomes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 March 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/03/050323115713.htm>.
American Academy Of Periodontology. (2005, March 23). Oral Bacteria May Predict Pregnancy Outcomes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 18, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/03/050323115713.htm
American Academy Of Periodontology. "Oral Bacteria May Predict Pregnancy Outcomes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/03/050323115713.htm (accessed April 18, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, April 18, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Our Love Of Puppy Dog Eyes Explained By Science

Our Love Of Puppy Dog Eyes Explained By Science

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2015) Researchers found a spike in oxytocin occurs in both humans and dogs when they gaze into each other&apos;s eyes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Find Link Between Gestational Diabetes And Autism

Scientists Find Link Between Gestational Diabetes And Autism

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2015) Researchers who analyzed data from over 300,000 kids and their mothers say they&apos;ve found a link between gestational diabetes and autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Video Messages Help Reassure Dementia Patients

Video Messages Help Reassure Dementia Patients

AP (Apr. 17, 2015) Family members are prerecording messages as part of a unique pilot program at the Hebrew Home in New York. The videos are trying to help victims of Alzheimer&apos;s disease and other forms of dementia break through the morning fog of forgetfulness. (April 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Boy or Girl? Intersex Awareness Is on the Rise

Boy or Girl? Intersex Awareness Is on the Rise

AP (Apr. 17, 2015) At least 1 in 5,000 U.S. babies are born each year with intersex conditions _ ambiguous genitals because of genetic glitches or hormone problems. Secrecy and surgery are common. But some doctors and activists are trying to change things. (April 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins