Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Those At High-risk For Skin Cancer Burnt By Own Behaviour

Date:
May 16, 2005
Source:
McGill University
Summary:
Those considered high-risk for melanoma -- the most dangerous form of skin cancer -- are no more likely to sunbathe protected than those who are unaware of their risk, according to a new study conducted by MUHC researchers. The study, published in the Journal of Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery, examined the behaviour of melanoma patients in order to assess the efficacy of sun-awareness and protection campaigns.

Montreal, 17 May 2005 -- Those considered high-risk for melanoma--the most dangerous form of skin cancer--are no more likely to sunbathe protected than those who are unaware of their risk, according to a new study conducted by MUHC researchers. The study, published in the Journal of Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery, examined the behaviour of melanoma patients in order to assess the efficacy of sun-awareness and protection campaigns.

Related Articles


"Patients with a personal or family history of melanoma, or that burn easily in the sun, are considered high-risk for melanoma, and should take extra care in the sun," says Dr. Beatrice Wang a dermatologist at the MUHC and assistant professor in the Department of Medicine at McGill. "Our results suggest that high-risk patients were no more likely to take proper precautions in the sun than the entire cohort studied." Those considered high-risk exhibited similar sunbathing patterns, use of indoor tanning beds and frequency of sunscreen and protective clothing use. Incredibly, the high-risk group even used, on average, a lower factor sunscreen (11 SPF for the high-risk group, compared to 18 SPF overall).

Sun-awareness campaigns increase public knowledge but may not translate into behavioral changes in practice, which is particularly alarming when reported for individuals in high-risk groups. "This problem is also encountered by health professionals who educate people to quit smoking, lose weight and exercise more," says Dr. Wang. "It seems we are all teenagers inside, and believe we are invincible to the cumulative dangers of these activities."

Immediately after diagnosis for melanoma, however, patients made significant changes to reduce their sun exposure. After diagnosis, 79% of patients avoided sunbathing (compared to 28% pre-diagnosis); 93% used sunscreen (compared to 69% pre-diagnosis); and 85% use protective clothing (compared to 31% pre-diagnosis). "Malignant melanoma is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide," says Dr. Wang. "Prevention is the key to reducing deaths, as such it is vital that we continually assess and improve our education and awareness campaigns."

###

Study title: Impact of melanoma diagnosis on sun-awareness and protection: efficacy of education campaigns in a high-risk population. Publication: Journal of Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery
Authors: Anatoli Freiman, John Yu, Antoine Loutfi and Beatrice Wang

The McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) is a comprehensive academic health institution with an international reputation for excellence in clinical programs, research and teaching. The MUHC is a merger of five teaching hospitals affiliated with the Faculty of Medicine at McGill University -- the Montreal Children's, Montreal General, Royal Victoria, and Montreal Neurological Hospitals, as well as the Montreal Chest Institute. Building on the tradition of medical leadership of the founding hospitals, the goal of the MUHC is to provide patient care based on the most advanced knowledge in the health care field, and to contribute to the development of new knowledge.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by McGill University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

McGill University. "Those At High-risk For Skin Cancer Burnt By Own Behaviour." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 May 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/05/050516191727.htm>.
McGill University. (2005, May 16). Those At High-risk For Skin Cancer Burnt By Own Behaviour. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/05/050516191727.htm
McGill University. "Those At High-risk For Skin Cancer Burnt By Own Behaviour." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/05/050516191727.htm (accessed October 30, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Fauci Says Ebola Risk in US "essentially Zero"

Fauci Says Ebola Risk in US "essentially Zero"

AP (Oct. 30, 2014) NIAID Director Anthony Fauci said the risk of Ebola becoming an epidemic in the U.S. is essentially zero Thursday at the Washington Ideas Forum. He also said an Ebola vaccine will be tested in West Africa in the next few months. (Oct. 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Nurse Defies Ebola Quarantine With Bike Ride

Nurse Defies Ebola Quarantine With Bike Ride

AP (Oct. 30, 2014) A nurse who vowed to defy Maine's voluntary quarantine for health care workers who treated Ebola patients followed through on her promise Thursday, leaving her home for an hour-long bike ride. (Oct. 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Microsoft Launches Fitness Band After Accidental Reveal

Microsoft Launches Fitness Band After Accidental Reveal

Newsy (Oct. 30, 2014) Microsoft accidentally revealed its upcoming fitness band on Wednesday, so the company went ahead and announced it. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Studying Effects of Music on Dementia Patients

Studying Effects of Music on Dementia Patients

AP (Oct. 30, 2014) The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee is studying the popular Music and Memory program to see if music, which helps improve the mood of Alzheimer's patients, can also reduce the use of prescription drugs for those suffering from dementia. (Oct. 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins