Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Once-a-month Naltrexone Successfully Used To Treat Alcohol Dependence

Date:
May 17, 2005
Source:
Yale University
Summary:
Once-a-month, long acting injections of the drug naltrexone, combiined with psychotherapy, signficantly reduced heavy drinking in patients being treated for alcohol dependence.

New Haven, Conn.-Long-acting injections of the drug naltrexone, combined with psychotherapy, significantly reduced heavy drinking in patients being treated for alcohol dependence, according to a study in the Journal of the American Medical Association by a Yale School of Medicine researcher.

"The decision to take medication can wane over time," said Stephanie O'Malley, professor of psychiatry and director of the Division of Substance Abuse Research at the Connecticut Mental Health Center at Yale. "This provides coverage for an entire month."

Acohol dependence ranks as the fourth leading cause of disability worldwide, as reported by the World Health Organization's Global Burden of Disease project. Nationwide, it is believed to contribute to more than 100,000 preventable deaths a year.

Naltrexone belongs to a class of drugs called opioid antagonists. Although many clinical trials have shown that oral naltrexone can be effective in treating alcohol dependence, its use in clinical practice has been limited, in part patients have to take the pill daily.

In this trial conducted at 24 sites, 627 alcohol dependent patients were randomly assigned to receive either an injection of long-acting naltrexone or a placebo injection; 624 ultimately received at least one injection. All participants received 12 counseling sessions during the six-month study in addition to the medication. Long-acting naltrexone was associated with a reduction in heavy drinking within the first month of treatment, and this response was maintained over the six month treatment period.

The lead author was James Garbult, M.D., of the University of North Carolina School of Medicine.

###

The study was funded by Alkermes Inc., a biotechnology company based in Cambridge, Mass., that manufactures the long acting naltrexone formulation.

Journal of the American Medical Association (April 6, 2005)


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Yale University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Yale University. "Once-a-month Naltrexone Successfully Used To Treat Alcohol Dependence." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 May 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/05/050517094735.htm>.
Yale University. (2005, May 17). Once-a-month Naltrexone Successfully Used To Treat Alcohol Dependence. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/05/050517094735.htm
Yale University. "Once-a-month Naltrexone Successfully Used To Treat Alcohol Dependence." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/05/050517094735.htm (accessed September 18, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Food Addiction Might Be Caused By PTSD

Food Addiction Might Be Caused By PTSD

Newsy (Sep. 18, 2014) New research shows that women who suffer from PTSD are three times more likely to develop a food addiction. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Corporal Punishment on Decline, Debate Renews

Corporal Punishment on Decline, Debate Renews

AP (Sep. 16, 2014) Corporal punishment in the United States is on the decline, but there is renewed debate over its use after Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson was charged with child abuse. (Sept. 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
FDA Eyes Skin Shocks Used at Mass. School

FDA Eyes Skin Shocks Used at Mass. School

AP (Sep. 15, 2014) The FDA is considering whether to ban devices used by the Judge Rotenberg Educational Center in Canton, Massachusetts, the only place in the country known to use electrical skin shocks as aversive conditioning for aggressive patients. (Sept. 15) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Shocker: Journalists Are Utterly Addicted To Coffee

Shocker: Journalists Are Utterly Addicted To Coffee

Newsy (Sep. 13, 2014) A U.K. survey found that journalists consumed the most amount of coffee, but that's only the tip of the coffee-related statistics iceberg. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins