Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Women More Afraid Of Dentists Than Men: University Of Toronto Study

Date:
June 22, 2005
Source:
University of Toronto
Summary:
Women are 2.5 times more likely than men to fear a visit to the dentist, says a new University of Toronto study.

Women are 2.5 times more likely than men to fear a visit to the dentist, says a new University of Toronto study.

The research, conducted by U of T master's degree candidate Brian Chanpong and dentistry professors Daniel Haas and David Locker, is the first-ever nationwide Canadian study of fear and anxiety about visiting the dentist. It is published in the June issue of Anesthesia Progress. The researchers say the level of fear among men is probably underreported.

"Women are more likely to be honest about their feelings," says Chanpong, who is now practising dental anesthesia in Vancouver. "The typical male would be less likely to admit to being afraid of the dentist." Yet, adds Haas, "It's the young, healthy males who are the ones who often faint in the dental office."

Overall, 5.5 per cent of the 1,100 Canadians surveyed were very afraid of seeing a dentist, and about half of those had cancelled or avoided a dental appointment as a result, compared with only 5.2 per cent of those people who reported low anxiety. Extrapolate the numbers to the adult Canadian population, and the data suggest more than 400,000 people may not have visited the dentist last year due to fear or anxiety; more than 1.5 million may have cancelled or avoided an appointment at some time in their lives.

"If it's left, people may get by, but cavities and gum disease can lead to infection and to a serious, systemic health issue," says Haas. "It's not just a cosmetic issue." One potential remedy is increased use of general anesthesia or sedation. The survey data indicate that 12.4 per cent of those surveyed were definitely interested in those options, with another 42.3 per cent expressing interest if the cost were not prohibitive.

"Both dentists and the general public need to be aware that these options are available," says Haas. "Consider comparable medical procedures -- people never even question whether there's a need for sedation, it's simply accepted practice."



Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Toronto. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Toronto. "Women More Afraid Of Dentists Than Men: University Of Toronto Study." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 June 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050621094848.htm>.
University of Toronto. (2005, June 22). Women More Afraid Of Dentists Than Men: University Of Toronto Study. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050621094848.htm
University of Toronto. "Women More Afraid Of Dentists Than Men: University Of Toronto Study." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050621094848.htm (accessed September 17, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

Newsy (Sep. 16, 2014) President Obama is expected to send 3,000 troops to West Africa as part of the effort to contain Ebola's spread. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Man Floats for 31 Hours in Gulf Waters

Man Floats for 31 Hours in Gulf Waters

AP (Sep. 16, 2014) A Texas man is lucky to be alive after he and three others floated for more than a day in the Gulf of Mexico when their boat sank during a fishing trip. (Sept. 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ivorians Abandon Monkey Pets in Fear Over Ebola Virus

Ivorians Abandon Monkey Pets in Fear Over Ebola Virus

AFP (Sep. 16, 2014) Since the arrival of Ebola in Ivory Coast, Ivorians have been abandoning their pets, particularly monkeys, in the fear that they may transmit the virus. Duration: 00:47 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Study Links Male-Pattern Baldness To Prostate Cancer

Study Links Male-Pattern Baldness To Prostate Cancer

Newsy (Sep. 16, 2014) New findings suggest men with a certain type of baldness at age 45 are 39 percent more likely to develop aggressive prostate cancer. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

      Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile: iPhone Android Web
      Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins