Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Study Links Race To Risk Of Advanced Colorectal Cancer, Death

Date:
June 27, 2005
Source:
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Summary:
A new study finds wide variations in colorectal cancer stage of diagnosis and mortality, with some ethnic groups having 10 to 60 percent higher risks of stage III or IV colorectal cancer compared to non-Hispanic whites, and 20 to 30 percent higher risk of death from the disease.

A new study finds wide variations in colorectal cancer stage of diagnosis and mortality, with some ethnic groups having 10 to 60 percent higher risks of stage III or IV colorectal cancer compared to non-Hispanic whites, and 20 to 30 percent higher risk of death from the disease. The report, the first comprehensive study of the relationship between racial subgroups and colorectal cancer outcome, appears in the August 1, 2005 issue of CANCER, a peer reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society.

Related Articles


Colorectal cancer is common, causing 11 percent of all cancer-related deaths in the United States. Prognosis is dependent on the stage of disease at diagnosis, treatment, and, according to many studies, race. Studies have found that African Americans and Native Americans are more likely to be diagnosed with advanced disease and die of their disease compared to Asian Americans and non-Hispanic whites. A few studies that look at a few specific subgroups compared to non-Hispanic whites suggest more variation in cancer risks than the broader categories imply.

Led by Chloe Chien, M.S., researchers from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, reviewed patient data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program to evaluate the relationship between 18 racial categories and stage of disease and mortality.

Analysis across conventional racial categories demonstrated that African Americans, Native Americans, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and Hispanic whites were more likely to be diagnosed with advanced stages of colorectal cancer compared to non-Hispanic whites. In addition, African Americans, Native Americans, and Hispanic whites had higher risks of dying from colorectal cancer, while Asians/Pacific Islanders had a lower risk compared to non-Hispanic whites. However, dividing these broad categories demonstrated much more variation. Within the category of Asian/Pacific Islander, risk of stage IV disease and/or death was lower for Chinese, Japanese, and Indian/Pakistanis but elevated for Filipinos and Hawaiians compared to non-Hispanic whites. Within the category of Hispanic white, risk of stage IV disease and/or death compared to non-Hispanic whites was similar for Cubans and Puerto Ricans but elevated for Mexicans and South/Central Americans.

"We observed numerous differences in the risks of advanced stage CRC and mortality across individuals in different Asian/Pacific Islander and Hispanic white subgroups," conclude Ms. Chien and her colleagues, "suggesting that it is important to take into account the heterogeneity of broad racial/ethnic categories when evaluating risks in these populations."

###

Article: "Differences in Colorectal Carcinoma Stage and Survival by Race and Ethnicity," Chloe Chien, Libby M. Morimoto, Jamie Tom, Christopher I. Li, CANCER; Published Online: June 27, 2005 (DOI: 10.1002/cncr.21204); Print Issue Date: August 1, 2005. Article is available via Wiley InterScience at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/cancer-newsroom.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

John Wiley & Sons, Inc.. "Study Links Race To Risk Of Advanced Colorectal Cancer, Death." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 June 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050627061421.htm>.
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.. (2005, June 27). Study Links Race To Risk Of Advanced Colorectal Cancer, Death. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 26, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050627061421.htm
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.. "Study Links Race To Risk Of Advanced Colorectal Cancer, Death." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050627061421.htm (accessed February 26, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, February 26, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Sleeping Too Much Or Too Little Might Increase Stroke Risk

Sleeping Too Much Or Too Little Might Increase Stroke Risk

Newsy (Feb. 26, 2015) People who sleep more than eight hours per night are 45 percent more likely to have a stroke, according to a University of Cambridge study. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
London Show Dissects History of Forensic Science

London Show Dissects History of Forensic Science

AFP (Feb. 25, 2015) Forensic science, which has fascinated generations with its unravelling of gruesome crime mysteries, is being put under the microscope in an exhibition of real criminal investigations in London. Duration: 00:53 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Michigan Couple Celebrates Identical Triplets

Michigan Couple Celebrates Identical Triplets

AP (Feb. 25, 2015) A suburban Detroit couple who have two older children are adjusting to life after becoming parents to identical triplets _ a multiple birth a doctor calls rare. (Feb. 25) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Mayor Says District of Columbia to Go Ahead With Pot Legalization

Mayor Says District of Columbia to Go Ahead With Pot Legalization

Reuters - News Video Online (Feb. 25, 2015) Washington&apos;s mayor says the District of Columbia will move forward with marijuana legalization, despite pushback from Congress. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins