Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Short-term Bio Sensors Monitor From Afar

Date:
September 12, 2005
Source:
Penn State
Summary:
A temporary under-the-skin sensor could monitor a variety of health indicators for soldiers, athletes, diabetics, infants, and critically ill patients without wires and at a distance, according to a team of Penn State chemical engineers.

A temporary under-the-skin sensor could monitor a variety of healthindicators for soldiers, athletes, diabetics, infants, and criticallyill patients without wires and at a distance, according to a team ofPenn State chemical engineers.

Related Articles


"We were asked to develop micro sensors for metabolic monitoring oftroops," says Dr. Michael Pishko, professor of chemical engineering andmaterials science and engineering. "These implantable sensors areintended to monitor the physiology of troops in the field."

By monitoring glucose, oxygen, lactose and pyruvate, the U.S. Armyhopes to be able to assess the metabolic health of troops in the fieldand improve the response to the injured.

The researchers, who include Pishko, Dr. Amos M. Mugweru, postdoctoralresearcher, and Becky Clark, graduate student in chemical engineering,designed an implantable glucose sensor of glucose oxidase molecules --the enzyme that reacts to glucose -- immobilized in photopolymerizedand microlithographically patterned film. The polymer exchangeselectrons with the glucose oxide to produce a current, which is thesignal that can be monitored from afar.

"We cannot make the sensors too small, because they need to be bigenough to handle and sturdy enough to be inserted without bending orbreaking," says Pishko. "We do want to have two to four sensors perindicator so that the signal is verifiable and viable even if onesensor fails."

Sensors could be bundled in groups depending on the metabolite to be monitored.

"The enzymes entrapped in these polymer films and containingbiocompatible hydrogels show good stability and sensitivity," theresearchers told attendees today (Aug. 31) at the 230th AmericanChemical Society National Meeting in Washington, D.C.

The military is interested in monitoring glucose, pyruvate, lactate andoxygen for an overall metabolic picture, so four separate sets ofsensors would be necessary, each individually addressable. Personnel ina distant base camp could monitor the soldiers' health and relayinformation into the field. These metabolic readings would also helpmedics decide who to treat first and assess the severity of injuries.

Individual sensors also have their place. The researchers are workingwith the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation on glucose sensors. Exercisephysiologists would like to be able to monitor lactate as a measure ofhow hard muscles are working. Pediatricians would also like to be ableto monitor the functions of the tiniest of newborns.

Because these sensors would be implantable and temporary, one day,marathon runners might need not only to pin on their numbers, but alsoto receive their implantable metabolic sensor array before approachingthe starting line.

"The body is hostile to this kind of implant and the sensors willeventually wear out," says Pishko. "For these applications, the sensorsonly need to work for a short period of time. Even for the soldiers, 24to 72 hours is sufficient."

###

The U.S. Army funded this research.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Penn State. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Penn State. "Short-term Bio Sensors Monitor From Afar." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 September 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/09/050912075318.htm>.
Penn State. (2005, September 12). Short-term Bio Sensors Monitor From Afar. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/09/050912075318.htm
Penn State. "Short-term Bio Sensors Monitor From Afar." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/09/050912075318.htm (accessed December 19, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Matter & Energy News

Friday, December 19, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Building Google Into Cars

Building Google Into Cars

Reuters - Business Video Online (Dec. 19, 2014) Google's next Android version could become the standard that'll power your vehicle's entertainment and navigation features, Reuters has learned. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
AP Review: Nikon D750 and GoPro Hero 4

AP Review: Nikon D750 and GoPro Hero 4

AP (Dec. 19, 2014) What to buy an experienced photographer or video shooter? There is some strong gear on the market from Nikon and GoPro. The AP's Ron Harris takes a closer look. (Dec. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Double-Amputee Becomes First To Move Two Prosthetic Arms With His Mind

Double-Amputee Becomes First To Move Two Prosthetic Arms With His Mind

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) A double-amputee makes history by becoming the first person to wear and operate two prosthetic arms using only his mind. Jen Markham has the story. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Navy Unveils Robot Fish

Navy Unveils Robot Fish

Reuters - Light News Video Online (Dec. 18, 2014) The U.S. Navy unveils an underwater device that mimics the movement of a fish. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins