Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

One Third Of Patients Who Stop Treatment For Schizophrenia Early Do So Due To Poor Response

Date:
December 26, 2005
Source:
BioMed Central
Summary:
A third of patients treated for schizophrenia who stop taking their medication early do so because they do not feel any significant improvement or because their symptoms are worsening. A study published today in the open access journal BMC Medicine reveals that patients with schizophrenia are three times more likely to stop treatment because of poor response or worsening symptoms, than because of adverse non-psychiatric side effects.

A third of patients treated for schizophrenia who stop taking their medication early do so because they do not feel any significant improvement or because their symptoms are worsening. A study published today in the open access journal BMC Medicine reveals that patients with schizophrenia are three times more likely to stop treatment because of poor response or worsening symptoms, than because of adverse non-psychiatric side effects.

Related Articles


Hong Liu-Seifert and colleagues from Eli Lilly and Company in Indianapolis, USA, analysed the reasons for stopping treatment of patients who took part in four previous Eli Lilly studies. The studies included a total of 1627 patients and compared the effects of taking olanzapine, risperidone, quetiapine or ziprasidone in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia or related disorders.

Liu-Seifert et al.'s analysis shows that 53% (866/1627) of patients stopped treatment early. Of the 866 patients who stopped treatment, 36% (315/866) did so because the treatment was felt not to be effective or because their symptoms worsened. Only 12% of patients who stopped treatment early did so because of adverse events such as dizziness, fatigue, vomiting or weight gain.

Of the 315 patients who stopped because of poor response to treatment, 80% stopped because they themselves believed it wasn't effective. Only 20% of the patients studied stopped taking medication based on a doctor's decision that the treatment wasn't effective.

"Discontinuation due to patient perception of poor response appeared to occur particularly early in the course of treatment," the authors write. Liu-Seifert et al. found that patients who experienced an early response to medication were 80% more likely to complete treatment.

The authors' findings suggest that early and effective symptom control, and discussing expectations of treatment, may help to ensure that people suffering from schizophrenia continue to take their medication.

###

Article:
Discontinuation of treatment of schizophrenic patients is driven by poor symptom response: a pooled post-hoc analysis of four atypical antipsychotic drugs
Hong Liu-Seifert, David H Adams and Bruce J Kinon
BMC Medicine 2005, 3:21 (23 December 2005)


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by BioMed Central. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

BioMed Central. "One Third Of Patients Who Stop Treatment For Schizophrenia Early Do So Due To Poor Response." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 December 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/12/051226101504.htm>.
BioMed Central. (2005, December 26). One Third Of Patients Who Stop Treatment For Schizophrenia Early Do So Due To Poor Response. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/12/051226101504.htm
BioMed Central. "One Third Of Patients Who Stop Treatment For Schizophrenia Early Do So Due To Poor Response." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/12/051226101504.htm (accessed November 27, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Mind & Brain News

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Newsy (Nov. 24, 2014) — A new study links greater authority with increased depressive symptoms among women in the workplace. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Winter Can Cause Depression — Here's How To Combat It

Winter Can Cause Depression — Here's How To Combat It

Newsy (Nov. 23, 2014) — Millions of American suffer from seasonal depression every year. It can lead to adverse health effects, but there are ways to ease symptoms. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) — Researchers in Beijing discovered a gene called 5-HTA1, and carriers are reportedly 20 percent more likely to be single. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Milestone Birthdays Can Bring Existential Crisis, Study Says

Milestone Birthdays Can Bring Existential Crisis, Study Says

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) — Researchers find that as people approach new decades in their lives they make bigger life decisions. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins