Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Antipsychotic Drug May Block Addiction, Researchers Find

Date:
February 13, 2006
Source:
University of Illinois at Chicago
Summary:
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have discovered that a long-approved oral antipsychotic drug can stop the addictive properties of opioid painkillers in mice.

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have discovered that a long-approved oral antipsychotic drug can stop the addictive properties of opioid painkillers in mice.

The researchers injected a small dose (half a milligram) of trifluoperazine -- used in the treatment of mental diseases such as schizophrenia -- into laboratory mice hooked on morphine. After a few hours their addiction was gone, said Z. Jim Wang, assistant professor of pharmacology in the UIC College of Pharmacy.

This is the first time any study has shown the anti-addictive property of trifluoperazine, Wang said.

"From studies conducted in the 1970s and 1980s, we know that trifluoperazine inhibits calmodulin," Wang said, a molecule that is required for the activation of an enzyme called calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase-2. "In previous studies we performed at UIC, we know that CaMK-2 plays an important role in the generation and maintenance of opioid tolerance," he said. Tolerance is a hallmark of drug dependence.

"Trifluoperazine targets this pathway, which then stops the addiction," Wang said. "When this occurs, you can still use a relatively low dose of the painkiller to achieve fairly good pain control and no drug dependence."

Opioids such as morphine are commonly used in pain management, but many patients are wary of taking them because of concerns over addiction or adverse side effects.

The study, which began early last year and was supported in part by grants from the National Institutes of Health and the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education, is published in the journal Neuroscience Letters. It is now available online and will be printed later this month.

Other researchers involved in the study were graduate student Lei Tang and post-doctoral researcher Pradeep Shukla, both of the UIC College of Pharmacy.



Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Illinois at Chicago. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Illinois at Chicago. "Antipsychotic Drug May Block Addiction, Researchers Find." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 February 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/02/060213092323.htm>.
University of Illinois at Chicago. (2006, February 13). Antipsychotic Drug May Block Addiction, Researchers Find. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/02/060213092323.htm
University of Illinois at Chicago. "Antipsychotic Drug May Block Addiction, Researchers Find." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/02/060213092323.htm (accessed July 30, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

It's Not Just Facebook: OKCupid Experiments With Users Too

It's Not Just Facebook: OKCupid Experiments With Users Too

Newsy (July 29, 2014) If you've been looking for love online, there's a chance somebody has been looking at how you're looking. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Your Face Can Leave A Good Or Bad First Impression

How Your Face Can Leave A Good Or Bad First Impression

Newsy (July 29, 2014) Researchers have found certain facial features can make us seem more attractive or trustworthy. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Losing Sleep Leaves You Vulnerable To 'False Memories'

Losing Sleep Leaves You Vulnerable To 'False Memories'

Newsy (July 27, 2014) A new study shows sleep deprivation can make it harder for people to remember specific details of an event. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
University Quiz Implies Atheists Are Smarter Than Christians

University Quiz Implies Atheists Are Smarter Than Christians

Newsy (July 25, 2014) An online quiz from a required course at Ohio State is making waves for suggesting atheists are inherently smarter than Christians. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins