Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Lobster Telescope Has An Eye For X-Rays

Date:
April 5, 2006
Source:
University Of Leicester
Summary:
UK astronomers have been at the forefront of designing a revolutionary new X-ray telescope that is based on the eyes of a lobster. By replicating the crustacean's ability to observe objects all around it without turning its head, scientists are confident that the Lobster instrument will enable a major breakthrough in X-ray astronomy.

This ray-traced simulation show the Lobster instrument, as it would appear on the Columbus module of the ISS. The images were produced by Dave Watson.
Credit: Space Research Centre, University of Leicester

UK astronomers have been at the forefront of designing a revolutionary new X-ray telescope that is based on the eyes of a lobster. By replicating the crustacean's ability to observe objects all around it without turning its head, scientists are confident that the Lobster instrument will enable a major breakthrough in X-ray astronomy.

The sky viewed at X-ray wavelengths is a violent and unpredictable place. Many sources brighten without warning, then vanish just as suddenly. Others vary cyclically over a period that can range from minutes to years.

The ideal X-ray telescope, therefore, would observe 'all the sky, all of the time' an ideal which might seem unattainable, but which is approached by the Lobster concept, as described by Dr. Nigel Bannister (University of Leicester) at the RAS National Astronomy Meeting, University of Leicester, on 4 April.

"The great advantage of the Lobster design is an almost unlimited field of view," said Dr. Bannister. "This makes it ideal for use as an all-sky X-ray monitor."

In the 1970s, lobsters and some other crustacea were found to view the world through remarkable eyes which focus light over a very wide field of view by means of reflection, rather than by refraction or bending of light, as in the human eye.

The lobster eye “ essentially an array of tube-like channels with a square cross-section“ was proposed as the basis of an X-ray 'all-sky monitor' by Roger Angel of the University of Arizona in 1977. However, it has taken almost 30 years - and nearly 15 years from the first successful X-ray measurements with such structures in 1992 - to perfect the optic technology.

Only now is it possible to consider the space missions described by Nigel Bannister as practical propositions, with the Lobster All-Sky X-ray Monitor successfully completing a detailed European Space Agency (ESA) Phase-A study in 2005.

"The studies of Lobster conducted with ESA since 2001 suggest that the instrument will have an impact on almost every area of astrophysics," said Professor George Fraser, Director of the University of Leicester Space Research Centre and leader of the international team which has been studying Lobster.

"Originally, these studies concentrated on mounting the Lobster telescope modules on the International Space Station (ISS), but more recently we've been looking at a free-flying satellite platform provided by the Russians."

Fraser points out that it has not been easy as a British scientist leading a study for an ISS attached payload, since the UK does not contribute to the ISS programme. There has also been some scepticism regarding a collaboration with Russia since the failure of the Russian Spectrum X - Gamma project in the 1980s and 1990s.

"Nevertheless, I am confident that the Lobster concept will eventually make its impact on astrophysics," he said.

"The scientific impact of Lobster will span all of astronomy - from studies of the X-ray emission of comets to stars and quasars, from regular X-ray binaries to the catastrophic events of supernovæ and the enigmatic gamma-ray bursts.

"Through frequent re-observation of each point in the sky during the lifetime of the mission, Lobster offers the opportunity to perform deep, sensitive surveys of both galactic and extra-galactic sources.

"This will lead to the collation of a 'Lobster All-Sky Catalogue' containing hundreds of thousands of sources, including a significant population of objects for which photometry on approximately 1 day timescales will be available."

"Such a rich catalogue of sources offers an unprecedented opportunity to study the large-scale distribution of matter in the Universe, probing possible links between supercluster filamentary structures and the purported existence of dark matter in the cosmos."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Leicester. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Leicester. "Lobster Telescope Has An Eye For X-Rays." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 April 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/04/060404194138.htm>.
University Of Leicester. (2006, April 5). Lobster Telescope Has An Eye For X-Rays. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/04/060404194138.htm
University Of Leicester. "Lobster Telescope Has An Eye For X-Rays." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/04/060404194138.htm (accessed April 17, 2014).

Share This



More Space & Time News

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

New Baby Moon 'Peggy' Spotted In Saturn's Rings

New Baby Moon 'Peggy' Spotted In Saturn's Rings

Newsy (Apr. 15, 2014) — A bump in the rings could be a half-mile-wide miniature moon. It was found by accident in Cassini probe images. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Americas Glimpse Total Lunar Eclipse

Americas Glimpse Total Lunar Eclipse

AFP (Apr. 15, 2014) — A total lunar eclipse, the first since December 2011, took place early Tuesday morning with the Americas getting the best glimpse. Duration: 1:19 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
NASA Showcases Lunar Eclipse

NASA Showcases Lunar Eclipse

AP (Apr. 15, 2014) — Star gazers in parts of North and South America got a rare treat early Tuesday morning - a total eclipse of the moon. (April 15) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Spacecrafts Could Use Urine As Fuel Source

Spacecrafts Could Use Urine As Fuel Source

Newsy (Apr. 15, 2014) — New research says the urea from urine could be recycled for fuel. Urea is filtered out of wastewater when making drinking water. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins