Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Newly Discovered Protein Could Hold Key To Preventing Heart Disease

Date:
May 17, 2006
Source:
University of Central Florida
Summary:
A newly discovered gene known as MCPIP could provide scientists with the key to developing treatments for preventing inflammation that can cause heart disease, University of Central Florida researchers have discovered.

Asim Azfer is part of the research team led by Burnett College of Biomedical Sciences Dean Pappachan Kolattukudy that is studying the molecular changes that occur as heart disease develops. The team hopes its findings will help with the development of drugs to treat or prevent the disease.
Credit: Photo : Jacque Brund

A newly discovered gene known as MCPIP could provide scientists with the key to developing treatments for preventing inflammation that can cause heart disease, University of Central Florida researchers have discovered.

A research team led by Pappachan Kolattukudy, dean of the UCF Burnett College of Biomedical Sciences, found that the levels of MCPIP increased in mice as their blood vessels became inflamed and heart disease began to develop. The formation of MCPIP leads to the death of healthy cells, so treatments that block that formation could prove effective for heart disease.

The researchers are trying to discover the molecular changes that occur as heart disease develops. Better understanding those molecular changes would help with the development of drugs that can either prevent or treat the disease.

The team's findings are published in the May 12 issue of Circulation Research, the journal of the American Heart Association. The research is funded through a $1.4 million grant from the National Institutes of Health.

The laboratory mice developed heart disease in a way similar to how it forms in humans, which suggests that the findings could hold promise for treating human heart disease. However, more research is needed to evaluate whether the same results found in mice could be expected in humans.

The UCF research team already has found that MCPIP is elevated in human hearts suffering ischemic heart failure.

MCPIP is formed when an often-studied protein called MCP-1 binds to receptors. The MCP-1 protein helps to attract white blood cells known as monocytes to infected and injured areas of the body. The monocytes then attack bacteria and help the body fight diseases.

But that process also produces several known and unknown proteins. The researchers focused on MCPIP, one of the previously unknown proteins, because they discovered links between it and the deaths of healthy cells adjacent to the infected ones.

This finding could lead to advances in treating other inflammatory diseases such as arthritis and some forms of cancer.

Cardiovascular research is one of four main specialties at the Burnett College of Biomedical Sciences, which laid the foundation for the recently approved medical college at UCF. Kolattukudy began his research at Ohio State University before he moved to UCF in 2003.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Central Florida. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Central Florida. "Newly Discovered Protein Could Hold Key To Preventing Heart Disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 May 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/05/060517175849.htm>.
University of Central Florida. (2006, May 17). Newly Discovered Protein Could Hold Key To Preventing Heart Disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/05/060517175849.htm
University of Central Florida. "Newly Discovered Protein Could Hold Key To Preventing Heart Disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/05/060517175849.htm (accessed September 22, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, September 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Liberia Pleads for Help to Fight Ebola

Liberia Pleads for Help to Fight Ebola

AP (Sep. 22, 2014) Liberia's finance minister is urging the international community to quickly follow through on pledges of cash to battle Ebola. Bodies are piling up in the capital Monrovia as the nation awaits more help. (Sept. 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Doctor Says Border Controls Critical

Ebola Doctor Says Border Controls Critical

AP (Sep. 22, 2014) A Florida doctor who helped fight the expanding Ebola outbreak in West Africa says the disease can be stopped, but only if nations quickly step up their response and make border control a priority. (Sept. 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Global Ebola Aid Increasing But Critics Say It's Late

Global Ebola Aid Increasing But Critics Say It's Late

Newsy (Sep. 21, 2014) More than 100 tons of medical supplies were sent to West Africa on Saturday, but aid workers say the global response is still sluggish. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sierra Leone in Lockdown to Control Ebola

Sierra Leone in Lockdown to Control Ebola

AP (Sep. 21, 2014) Sierra Leone residents remained in lockdown on Saturday as part of a massive effort to confine millions of people to their homes in a bid to stem the biggest Ebola outbreak in history. (Sept. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins