Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Injecting Stem Cells From A Woman's Own Muscle May Effectively Treat Urinary Incontinence

Date:
May 30, 2006
Source:
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
Summary:
In the first clinical study of its kind in North America, women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) were treated using muscle-derived stem cell injections to strengthen deficient sphincter muscles responsible for the condition. Results of the study, led by researchers at Sunnybrook Health Science Centre in Toronto and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, suggest that the approach is safe, improves patients' quality of life and may be an effective treatment for SUI.

In the first clinical study of its kind in North America, women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) were treated using muscle-derived stem cell injections to strengthen deficient sphincter muscles responsible for the condition. Results of the study, led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto, suggest that the approach is safe, improves patients' quality of life and may be an effective treatment for SUI. The findings will be presented at an experts' session at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association (AUA) in Atlanta, and will be published in abstract 1185 in the AUA proceedings.

Related Articles


"The technique to achieve optimal efficacy is evolving, but we are pleased with what this study has shown," said principal investigator Lesley Carr, M.D., urologist at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and assistant professor at the University of Toronto. "We now have preliminary evidence that stem cells are safe to use and appear to improve female stress urinary incontinence."

Previous studies at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine in animal models with SUI demonstrated that injecting stem cells into the urethral muscles increases leak point pressure, leading to a restoration of the deficient muscles. The results of these studies formed the basis for the clinical trial.

"Our preliminary findings in this clinical trial are extremely encouraging, given that 13 million people, most of them women, cope with stress urinary incontinence in the United States," said Michael B. Chancellor, M.D., the study's senior author and professor of urology and gynecology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. "We're demonstrating for the first time that we may be able to offer people with SUI a long-term and minimally invasive treatment."

In the study, researchers took biopsies of skeletal muscle tissue from seven female patients and isolated and expanded the stem cells from the tissue in culture. In an outpatient setting, the patients then received injections of the muscle-derived stem cells into the area surrounding the urethra. Each patient received an equal dose of stem cell injections using three different injection techniques -- a transurethral injection with either an 8-mm or 10-mm needle or a periurethral injection.

Five of the seven women who participated in the study reported improvement in bladder control and quality of life with no serious short- or long-term adverse effects. These improvements were associated with both the 10-mm needle injections and the periurethral injections, which allowed the investigators to deliver the stem cells close to the damaged sphincter muscle. The 8-mm needle was not able to deliver the muscle stem cells deep enough into the tissue to reach the sphincter.

A follow-up multi-site study set to launch this summer will allow researchers to determine the optimal dose of muscle stem cells needed to effectively treat SUI.

Women with SUI involuntarily lose urine during activities that put pressure on the bladder, such as running, coughing, sneezing or laughing. Stress incontinence is caused by childbirth, menopause or pelvic surgery and is most often diagnosed in women during middle-age.

In addition to Drs. Carr and Chancellor, contributors to the study included Deborah Steele and Shannon Steele, with Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and David Wagner, Ryan Pruchnic, Ron Jankowski, Janet Erickson, Fernando de Miguel, Naoki Yoshimura and Johnny Huard, with the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. The study was funded by Cook MyoSite Inc. of Pittsburgh.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. "Injecting Stem Cells From A Woman's Own Muscle May Effectively Treat Urinary Incontinence." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 May 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/05/060530090811.htm>.
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. (2006, May 30). Injecting Stem Cells From A Woman's Own Muscle May Effectively Treat Urinary Incontinence. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 2, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/05/060530090811.htm
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. "Injecting Stem Cells From A Woman's Own Muscle May Effectively Treat Urinary Incontinence." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/05/060530090811.htm (accessed April 2, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, April 2, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Wound-Healing Laser Soon to Be a Reality Israeli Scientist

Wound-Healing Laser Soon to Be a Reality Israeli Scientist

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Apr. 1, 2015) Israeli scientists says laser bonding of tissue allows much faster healing and less scarring. Amy Pollock has more. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Sees Resurgence of Drug Trafficking as Ebola Wanes

Liberia Sees Resurgence of Drug Trafficking as Ebola Wanes

AFP (Apr. 1, 2015) The governments of Liberia and Sierra Leone have been busy fighting the menace created by the deadly Ebola virus, but illicit drug lords have taken advantage of the situation to advance the drug trade. Duration: 01:12 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Stigma Stalks India's Leprosy Sufferers as Disease Returns

Stigma Stalks India's Leprosy Sufferers as Disease Returns

AFP (Apr. 1, 2015) The Indian government declared victory over leprosy in 2005, but the disease is making a comeback in some parts of the country, with more than a hundred thousand lepers still living in colonies, shunned from society. Duration: 02:41 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
7-Year-Old Girl Gets 3-D Printed 'robohand'

7-Year-Old Girl Gets 3-D Printed 'robohand'

AP (Mar. 31, 2015) Although she never had much interest in prosthetic limbs before, Faith Lennox couldn&apos;t wait to slip on her new robohand. The 7-year-old, who lost part of her left arm when she was a baby, grabbed it as soon as it came off a 3-D printer. (March 31) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins