Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Tumor Response May Not Be Best Measure Of Efficacy In Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment

Date:
June 19, 2006
Source:
University of California, Davis - Health System
Summary:
A new Southwest Oncology Group study led by a team of UC Davis Cancer Center researchers suggests that an alternative measurement -- "disease control rate" -- may predict a new drug's efficacy better than the traditional measure, which relies on tumor response.

Researchers typically evaluate the effectiveness of a new cancer treatment by looking at how tumors respond to it. But in the case of advanced non-small cell lung cancer, there may be a better way to assess effectiveness.

A new Southwest Oncology Group study led by a team of UC Davis Cancer Center researchers suggests that an alternative measurement — “disease control rate” — may be a more powerful predictor of survival than tumor shrinkage. The research was presented recently at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Atlanta.

“If validated, this 'early look' statistical measure could enhance efficacy assessment, with broad implications for the design of future cancer clinical trials for advanced non-small cell lung cancer,” said Primo N. Lara, Jr., associate professor of hematology and oncology at UC Davis Cancer Center and lead author of the new study.

Lara and his colleagues defined the disease control rate as the percentage of patients who have a partial or complete response to an investigational treatment plus those whose disease stabilizes.

“In the past, we have used the complete response rate plus the partial response rate, or CR + PR, as our sole efficacy measure,” Lara said. “The disease control rate, DCR, is the complete response rate plus the partial response rate plus the rate of patients with stabilized disease, or DCR = CR + PR + SD. This measure may better predict how a new drug will affect survival.”

In their study, the investigators pooled data from 984 patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer who participated in three randomized SWOG trials of platinum-based chemotherapy regimens.

Of the 886 patients who were alive two months after beginning treatment, 62 percent had stable disease, meaning their cancer had not progressed since entering the clinical trial. Another 19 percent had a complete or partial response, meaning their tumors had disappeared or reduced in size. Adding the two measures together yielded a disease control rate of 81 percent.

When Lara and his colleagues compared the disease control rate to the standard measure (CR+PR), they found that the disease control rate had a much stronger association with survival.

“The cancer community is actively looking for ways to improve clinical trials, so that we can get better answers more efficiently and bring advances to our patients more rapidly. Nowhere is this more important than in lung cancer,” Lara said. “These findings will be prospectively tested in SWOG, but if they bear out, they may help us to design smarter clinical trials for lung and perhaps other cancers.”

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women in the United States. According to the American Cancer Society, an estimated 174,470 people will get lung cancer this year, and 162,460 will die from it. Non-small cell lung cancer accounts for about 80 percent of lung cancer cases.

Also participating in the new study were researchers from the Center for Research and Biostatistics in Seattle, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, University of Maryland, and University of Kansas.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of California, Davis - Health System. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of California, Davis - Health System. "Tumor Response May Not Be Best Measure Of Efficacy In Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 June 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/06/060618231618.htm>.
University of California, Davis - Health System. (2006, June 19). Tumor Response May Not Be Best Measure Of Efficacy In Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/06/060618231618.htm
University of California, Davis - Health System. "Tumor Response May Not Be Best Measure Of Efficacy In Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/06/060618231618.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

Newsy (Sep. 2, 2014) The U.N. says the problem is two-fold — quarantine zones and travel restrictions are limiting the movement of both people and food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

AFP (Sep. 1, 2014) Wedged between buses, lorries and cars, cycling in London isn't for the faint hearted. Nevertheless the number of people choosing to bike in the British capital has doubled over the past 15 years. Duration: 02:27 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Newsy (Sep. 1, 2014) New research says if you condition yourself to eat healthy foods, eventually you'll crave them instead of junk food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins