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Diet, Stress Management May Help Slow Spread Of Prostate Cancer

Date:
August 15, 2006
Source:
SAGE Publications
Summary:
Statistics say that one out of six American men will develop prostate cancer and more than a third will experience a recurrence after undergoing treatment, putting them at high risk to die of the disease. In a study published in SAGE publication's Integrative Cancer Therapies, Dr. Saxe and colleagues at the University of California, San Diego found that diet changes, reinforced by stress management training, may be effective in slowing the spread of this deadly cancer.

Statistics say that one out of six American men will develop prostate cancer and more than a third of them will experience a recurrence after undergoing treatment, putting them at high risk to die of the disease. In a recent study published in SAGE publication's Integrative Cancer Therapies, Dr. Gordon A. Saxe and colleagues at the Moores Cancer Center and School of Medicine at the University of California, San Diego found that diet changes, reinforced by stress management training, appeared to be effective in slowing or halting the spread of this deadly cancer.

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The study, published in the September issue of Integrative Cancer Therapies, focused on the change in the levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), an indicator of the cancer, in response to a plant-based diet and stress reduction. Patients were taught to increase consumption of plant-based foods such as whole grains, cruciferous and leafy green vegetables, beans and legumes, and fruit, and to decrease the intake of meat, dairy products, and refined carbohydrates. They were also provided with stress management training, which incorporated meditation, yoga and Tai Chi exercises. The plant-based diet and stress reduction were effective in significantly reducing the PSA rate, indicating a reduction in the rate of progression of the prostate cancer.

"The magnitude of effect of these findings is the strongest observed to date among dietary and nutritional interventions in this patient population," states Dr. Saxe, assistant professor of Family and Preventive Medicine. "These results provide preliminary evidence that adoption of a plant-based diet, in combination with stress reduction, may attenuate disease progression and have therapeutic potential for management of recurrent prostate cancer."

The article "Potential Attenuation of Disease Progression in Recurrent Prostate Cancer Progression With Plant-based Diet and Stress Reduction" can be accessed at no-charge for a limited time on the SAGE Publications' Integrative Cancer Therapies web site at http://ict.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/5/3/206.

About Integrative Cancer Therapies
Written for everyone involved in comprehensive cancer treatment and care--from physicians and other health care professionals to complementary and alternative practitioners to informed patients-- Integrative Cancer Therapies focuses on evidence based and scientifically sound understanding of the mechanisms of cancer therapies and the physiology of disease conditions, as well as the psychosocial and spiritual needs of the patient. The journal is edited by Dr. Keith Block, Medical and Scientific Director of the Institute for Integrative Cancer Care. http://ict.sagepub.com

SAGE Publications is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets. Since 1965, SAGE has helped inform and educate a global community of scholars, practitioners, researchers, and students spanning a wide range of subject areas including business, humanities, social sciences, and science, technology and medicine. SAGE Publications, a privately owned corporation, has principal offices in Thousand Oaks, California, London, United Kingdom, and New Delhi, India. http://www.sagepublications.com


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by SAGE Publications. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

SAGE Publications. "Diet, Stress Management May Help Slow Spread Of Prostate Cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 August 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/08/060815102323.htm>.
SAGE Publications. (2006, August 15). Diet, Stress Management May Help Slow Spread Of Prostate Cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/08/060815102323.htm
SAGE Publications. "Diet, Stress Management May Help Slow Spread Of Prostate Cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/08/060815102323.htm (accessed December 18, 2014).

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