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Ultrathin, Dye-sensitized Solar Cells Called Most Efficient To Date

Date:
September 20, 2006
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Researchers in Switzerland have developed dye-sensitized solar cells that have reached the highest efficiencies to date among a new generation of thin film photovoltaic devices that show promise as a low-cost energy source.
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Researchers in Switzerland have developed dye-sensitized solar cells that have reached the highest efficiencies to date among a new generation of thin film photovoltaic devices that show promise as a low-cost energy source.

The new cells, composed of an ultrathin film of nano-sized semiconductor crystals such as titanium dioxide, have been shown in laboratory studies to produce efficiencies of 11 percent.

By comparison, most new solar cells have efficiencies between 4 percent and 5 percent, according to Michael Graetzel, Ph.D., a chemist at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne.

Graetzel's cells, which can be engineered into inexpensive, flexible sheets, could be used as coatings on glass windows to supply electric power to homes and businesses or as coatings on tents to supply power for soldiers in the field.

The cells could be used in consumer applications within two to three years, the researcher says.


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The above post is reprinted from materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


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American Chemical Society. "Ultrathin, Dye-sensitized Solar Cells Called Most Efficient To Date." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 September 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/09/060918201621.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2006, September 20). Ultrathin, Dye-sensitized Solar Cells Called Most Efficient To Date. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/09/060918201621.htm
American Chemical Society. "Ultrathin, Dye-sensitized Solar Cells Called Most Efficient To Date." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/09/060918201621.htm (accessed August 1, 2015).

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