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Perceived Facial Similarity Of Children Is An Estimate Of Kin Recognition

Date:
September 20, 2006
Source:
Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology
Summary:
Perceived facial similarity of children is effectively an estimate of the probability that two children are close genetic relatives according to a new study recently published in Journal of Vision, an online, free access publication of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.

Perceived facial similarity of children is effectively an estimate of the probability that two children are close genetic relatives according to a new study recently published in Journal of Vision, an online, free access publication of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO).

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Participants in the study judged pairs of pictures of children, half of which portrayed actual siblings. In one condition, participants was only asked to rate the facial similarity of each pair of children. In a second condition, participants were asked to classify each pair as sibling or non-siblings. Researchers found that the mean similarity ratings of the first group contained as much information about genetic relatedness as did the actual judgments of genetic relatedness by the second group. These ratings could also be transformed into accurate estimates of the probability that a given pair of children portrayed siblings. The study was conducted by researchers Laurence T. Maloney, of New York University's Psychology Department and Center for Neural Science, and Maria F. Dal Martello, of the Department of General Psychology at the University of Padova in Italy.

"We have shown that a complex, difficult to characterize perceptual judgment ('facial similarity') can be simply defined in evolutionary terms: judged facial similarity of children appears to be little more than a visual assessment of genetic relatedness," said Maloney.

You can read this article online in Journal of Vision at http://www.journalofvision.org/6/10/4/.

Journal of Vision is published by ARVO, the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. All articles are free and open to anyone.

Established in 1928, The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc. (ARVO) is a membership organization of more than 11,500 eye and vision researchers from over 70 countries. The Association encourages and assists its members and others in research, training, publication and dissemination of knowledge in vision and ophthalmology. ARVO's headquarters are located in Rockville, Md. The Association's Web site is http://www.arvo.org.


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The above story is based on materials provided by Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. "Perceived Facial Similarity Of Children Is An Estimate Of Kin Recognition." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 September 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/09/060919102033.htm>.
Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. (2006, September 20). Perceived Facial Similarity Of Children Is An Estimate Of Kin Recognition. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/09/060919102033.htm
Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. "Perceived Facial Similarity Of Children Is An Estimate Of Kin Recognition." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/09/060919102033.htm (accessed December 19, 2014).

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