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Livermore Scientists Team With Russia To Discover Element 118

Date:
October 16, 2006
Source:
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Summary:
American and Russian scientists have confirmed the discovery of the newest superheavy element -- element 118. "The decay properties of all the isotopes that we have made so far paint the picture of a large, sort of flat 'Island of Stability' and indicate that we may have luck if we try to go even heavier," said Ken Moody, Livermore's team leader.

Calcium ions travel down the accelerator at a high velocity toward the rotating californium target.
Credit: Image courtesy of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Scientists from the Chemistry, Materials and Life Sciences Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in collaboration with researchers from Dubna, the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Russia , have discovered the newest superheavy element, element 118.

In experiments conducted at the JINR U400 cyclotron between February and June 2005, the researchers observed atomic decay patterns, or chains, that establish the existence of element 118. In these decay chains, previously observed element 116 is produced via the alpha decay of element 118.

The results are published in the October 2006 edition of the journal Physical Review C.

The experiment produced three atoms of element 118 when calcium ions bombarded a californium target. The team then observed the alpha decay from element 118 to element 116 and then to element 114. The Livermore-Dubna team had created the same isotope of element 116 in earlier experiments.

This discovery brings the total to five new elements for the Livermore-Dubna collaboration (113, 114, 115, 116 and 118).

“The decay properties of all the isotopes that we have made so far paint the picture of a large, sort of flat ‘Island of Stability’ and indicate that we may have luck if we try to go even heavier,” said Ken Moody, Livermore’s team leader.

The “Island of Stability” is a term from nuclear physics that describes the possibility of elements which have particularly stable “magic numbers” of protons and neutrons. This would allow certain isotopes of some transuranic elements (elements with atomic numbers greater than 92) to be far more stable than others, and thus decay much more slowly.

Element 118 is expected to be a noble gas that lies right below radon on the periodic table of elements.

“The world is made up of about 90 elements,” Moody said. “Anything more you can learn about the periodic table is exciting. It can tell us why the world is here and what it is made of.”

Members of the Livermore team include: Moody, Dawn Shaughnessy, Mark Stoyer, Nancy Stoyer, Philip Wilk, Jacqueline Kenneally, Jerry Landrum, John Wild, Ron Lougheed and former LLNL employee Joshua Patin.

“This is quite a breakthrough for science,” said Chemistry, Materials and Life Sciences Associate Director Tomas Diaz de la Rubia. “We’ve discovered a new element that provides insight into the makeup of the universe. For our scientists to find another piece of the puzzle is a testament to the strength and value of the science and technology at this Laboratory.”

Livermore has had a long-standing heavy element group since the inception of the Laboratory in 1952. The group has been successful in the discovery of several new elements over the years because it has access to unique materials to perform the experiments. In 1999 and 2001, the Laboratory announced the discovery of elements 114 and 116, respectively. In 2004, the Livermore-Dubna team observed the existence of elements 113 and 115.

As for the future, the LLNL-Dubna team will continue to map the region near the “Island of Stability.” In 2007, the team plans to look for element 120 by bombarding a plutonium target with iron isotopes.

“The heavy element community will continue to search for new elements until the limit of nuclear stability is found,” Mark Stoyer said. “It is expected that limit will be found.”

Founded in 1952, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has a mission to ensure national security and apply science and technology to the important issues of our time. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is managed by the University of California for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. "Livermore Scientists Team With Russia To Discover Element 118." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 October 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061016110022.htm>.
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. (2006, October 16). Livermore Scientists Team With Russia To Discover Element 118. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061016110022.htm
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. "Livermore Scientists Team With Russia To Discover Element 118." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061016110022.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

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