Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Who Should Receive Vaccines And Antiviral Drugs In The Event Of A Flu Pandemic?

Date:
October 18, 2006
Source:
Public Library of Science
Summary:
A new study in PLoS Medicine finds that 30 percent of nations have prioritized neither vaccine nor drugs in their pandemic influenza preparedness plans.

Since flu vaccine and antiviral drugs are in scarce supply, the WHO recommends that all nations determine in advance which groups of people will be the first to receive these treatments in the event of a flu pandemic. But a new study in PLoS Medicine finds that 30% of nations have prioritized neither vaccine nor drugs in their pandemic influenza preparedness plans.

Related Articles


In the first study of its scale, Lori Uscher-Pines and colleagues from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel, analyzed 45 national plans from both developed and developing countries. Plans from all regions of the world were represented in the analysis.

Of the national plans identified, 49% prioritized which groups in society would receive antiviral drugs while 62% prioritized which groups would receive flu vaccine. This is an unexpected finding, say the authors, since antivirals may be the first--and, perhaps, the only--pharmaceutical intervention available to many countries in a pandemic.

"Because it is estimated to take six months to mass produce strain-specific vaccine," they say, "and global antiviral production and stockpiling is increasing, priority setting for antivirals may prove to be more critical to pandemic preparedness."

The researchers found that that the allocation decisions varied across different countries. While health-care workers were consistently ranked at the top of the vaccine and antiviral priority lists, there was then a wide variation between countries in their choice of who would be next in line (e.g. elderly, children, essential service workers).

One striking finding was that of the nations that prioritized who would receive vaccine in a flu pandemic, almost half prioritized children, even though the WHO states in its guidelines: "There is no evidence that use of inactivated vaccine in children will reduce the spread of a pandemic in the community, and this strategy is not recommended."

The authors conclude that "attention to prioritization and its ethical implications may help to reduce death and disease burden, and minimize political destabilization and claims of injustice."

The study "Priority setting for pandemic influenza: an analysis of national preparedness plans" was co-authored by Saad B. Omer, Thomas A. Burke, and Daniel J. Barnett from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Ran D. Balicer from the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev.

Citation: Uscher-Pines L, Omer SB, Barnett DJ, Burke TA, Balicer RD (2006) Priority setting for pandemic influenza: An analysis of national preparedness plans. PLoS Med 3 (10): e436. (http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.0030436)


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Public Library of Science. "Who Should Receive Vaccines And Antiviral Drugs In The Event Of A Flu Pandemic?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 October 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061017085157.htm>.
Public Library of Science. (2006, October 18). Who Should Receive Vaccines And Antiviral Drugs In The Event Of A Flu Pandemic?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061017085157.htm
Public Library of Science. "Who Should Receive Vaccines And Antiviral Drugs In The Event Of A Flu Pandemic?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061017085157.htm (accessed November 1, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, November 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Melafind: Spotting Melanoma Without a Biopsy

Melafind: Spotting Melanoma Without a Biopsy

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) The MelaFind device is a pain-free way to check suspicious moles for melanoma, without the need for a biopsy. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Battling Multiple Myeloma

Battling Multiple Myeloma

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) The answer isn’t always found in new drugs – repurposing an ‘old’ drug that could mean better multiple myeloma treatment, and hope. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Chronic Inflammation and Prostate Cancer

Chronic Inflammation and Prostate Cancer

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) New information that is linking chronic inflammation in the prostate and prostate cancer, which may help doctors and patients prevent cancer in the future. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sickle Cell: Stopping Kids’ Silent Strokes

Sickle Cell: Stopping Kids’ Silent Strokes

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) Blood transfusions are proving crucial to young sickle cell patients by helping prevent strokes, even when there is no outward sign of brain injury. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins