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Spinal Cord Stimulation Can Relieve Low Back Pain

Date:
February 10, 2007
Source:
American Academy of Pain Medicine
Summary:
Careful patient selection and stimulation programming can improve management of axial low back pain with spinal cord stimulation, report researchers at the 23rd annual meeting of the American Academy of Pain Medicine in New Orleans. The researchers note that axial low back pain is a novel indication for spinal cord stimulation.
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Careful patient selection and stimulation programming can improve management of axial low back pain with spinal cord stimulation, report researchers at the 23rd annual meeting of the American Academy of Pain Medicine in New Orleans. The researchers note that axial low back pain is a novel indication for spinal cord stimulation. Technological capabilities of the spinal cord stimulation system, particularly fractionalized current across contacts, uniquely provide the type of stimulation needed to relieve axial back pain.

Spinal cord stimulation effectively manages a range of painful etiologies, but little published evidence supports its use for axial low back pain. The researchers studied 226 spinal cord stimulators (Precision™, Advanced Bionics) implanted in patients with axial low back pain to assess the therapeutic value of spinal cord stimulation in treating axial back pain associated with failed back surgery syndrome. Pain scores, quality of life, and disability assessments were gathered at three, six, and 12 months after activation of the spinal cord stimulation system and compared to baseline measures. Additional assessments were made at 3.5 months after a two-week period of no stimulation.

The investigators found that spinal cord stimulation significantly reduced axial low back pain, and when present, leg and foot pain, from baseline at all time points. With stimulation off, pain scores returned to near baseline. Quality of life and disability also significantly improved with spinal cord stimulation. Of 226 temporary trials, 172 (76%) were successful, and 159 subjects (70%) received permanent implants. Reported here are outcome data for all subjects through 3.5 months, and for those subjects who have completed six- and 12-month evaluations. A subsequent report will include all 12-month data. This study represents the largest prospective experience reported to date for spinal cord stimulation in axial low back pain.

Investigators: Benchmark Clinical Study Working Group, Advanced Bionics, Valencia, CA; Jim Thacker, MS, Enteromedics, St. Paul, MN; Todd Gross, PhD, Advanced Bionics, Valencia, CA; and Allison Foster, PhD, Advanced Bionics, Valencia, CA.


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The above post is reprinted from materials provided by American Academy of Pain Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


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American Academy of Pain Medicine. "Spinal Cord Stimulation Can Relieve Low Back Pain." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 February 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/02/070209074558.htm>.
American Academy of Pain Medicine. (2007, February 10). Spinal Cord Stimulation Can Relieve Low Back Pain. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/02/070209074558.htm
American Academy of Pain Medicine. "Spinal Cord Stimulation Can Relieve Low Back Pain." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/02/070209074558.htm (accessed September 2, 2015).

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