Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Born To Be Wild: Baby-boomer Bikers Dominate Roadways, But At A Cost

Date:
March 4, 2007
Source:
University of Michigan
Summary:
Perhaps inspired by the 1969 film classic "Easy Rider," today's baby boomers account for nearly two-thirds of all motorcyclists in Michigan - and, unfortunately, a rising number of crashes and deaths.

Perhaps inspired by the 1969 film classic “Easy Rider,” today’s baby boomers account for nearly two-thirds of all motorcyclists in Michigan—and, unfortunately, a rising number of crashes and deaths.

According to a new study by the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI), the number of motorcyclists 45 and older killed in crashes nearly quadrupled from 2001 to 2005 (the last year for which data is available). Crashes among this age group increased more than 60 percent during that time, compared with a 6 percent drop in the number of crashes for younger motorcycle riders.

“The aging of the motorcycling population in Michigan may be contributing to the increase in motorcycle fatalities,” said UMTRI researcher Lidia Kostyniuk. “As people age, their bodies become more fragile and their chances of dying as a result of a crash increase. This may well explain the increase in overall motorcycle fatalities that occurred in Michigan in 2005—a 54 percent increase from the year before.”

In their study of motorcycle crash trends in Michigan since 2001, Kostyniuk and colleague Adam Nation found that the number of motorcycle crashes overall increased 9 percent, while motorcycle registrations have risen 33 percent (to more than 250,000) and licensed motorcyclists have increased 9 percent (to nearly 500,000).

During that time, the crash rate per licensed rider has jumped more than 30 percent for older motorcyclists, but just 6 percent for motorcycle riders under 45, the study shows. However, younger bikers are still nearly three times as likely to be involved in a crash than their older counterparts and are more likely to be cited for hazardous actions, such as speeding, reckless driving and careless or negligent driving.

According to the study, about half of all motorcycle crashes, for both younger and older riders, involve other vehicles—whose drivers are more likely to be at fault. More than 60 percent of drivers of these other vehicles engaged in hazardous actions, such as failing to yield or failing to maintain a clear distance between their vehicle and the motorcycle, and about 30 percent of them were ticketed. Conversely, about half of motorcyclists involved in a crash with another car or truck drove hazardously, though only about 15 percent were cited.

Unfortunately, nearly two-thirds of fatalities and about half of all injuries to motorcycle riders in Michigan occur in crashes with other vehicles, Kostyniuk and Nation say.

Overall, the UMTRI study found that motorcycles were involved in about 12 percent of all fatal vehicle crashes in 2005—a 32 percent increase since 2001. The total number of all vehicle crashes resulting in death decreased by 15 percent over the same period. Likewise, the number of non-fatal injury motorcycle crashes increased by 11 percent during that time, but decreased 18 percent for all vehicles.

The researchers say that about 97 percent of motorcyclists involved in crashes since 2001 wore a helmet. About 3 percent of these riders were killed, 20 percent sustained severe injuries, 54 percent suffered minor injuries and 23 percent were not injured at all. Among helmet-less bikers who crashed, 5 percent were killed, 30 percent were severely injured, 53 percent had other injuries and 12 percent were not hurt.

They also found that most motorcycle crashes occur on dry roads (more than 90 percent), in good weather (more than 75 percent) and during the day (about 70 percent). And, in motorcycle crashes involving other vehicles in which either the rider or vehicle driver had been drinking, the biker was under the influence of alcohol 70 percent of the time.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Michigan. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Michigan. "Born To Be Wild: Baby-boomer Bikers Dominate Roadways, But At A Cost." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 March 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070302115657.htm>.
University of Michigan. (2007, March 4). Born To Be Wild: Baby-boomer Bikers Dominate Roadways, But At A Cost. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070302115657.htm
University of Michigan. "Born To Be Wild: Baby-boomer Bikers Dominate Roadways, But At A Cost." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070302115657.htm (accessed July 24, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Creative Makeovers for Ugly Cellphone Towers

Creative Makeovers for Ugly Cellphone Towers

AP (July 24, 2014) Mobile phone companies and communities across the country are going to new lengths to disguise those unsightly cellphone towers. From a church bell tower to a flagpole, even a pencil, some towers are trying to make a point. (July 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Algonquin Power Goes Activist on Its Target Gas Natural

Algonquin Power Goes Activist on Its Target Gas Natural

TheStreet (July 23, 2014) When The Deal's Amanda Levin exclusively reported that Gas Natural had been talking to potential suitors, the Ohio company responded with a flat denial, claiming its board had not talked to anyone about a possible sale. Lo and behold, Canadian utility Algonquin Power and Utilities not only had approached the company, but it did it three times. Its last offer was for $13 per share as Gas Natural's was trading at a 60-day moving average of about $12.50 per share. Now Algonquin, which has a 4.9% stake in Gas Natural, has taken its case to shareholders, calling on them to back its proposals or, possibly, a change in the target's board. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robot Parking Valet Creates Stress-Free Travel

Robot Parking Valet Creates Stress-Free Travel

AP (July 23, 2014) 'Ray' the robotic parking valet at Dusseldorf Airport in Germany lets travelers to avoid the hassle of finding a parking spot before heading to the check-in desk. (July 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Boeing Ups Outlook on 52% Profit Jump

Boeing Ups Outlook on 52% Profit Jump

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 23, 2014) Commercial aircraft deliveries rose seven percent at Boeing, prompting the aerospace company to boost full-year profit guidance- though quarterly revenues missed analyst estimates. Bobbi Rebell reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins