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Women Are Best At Being Buddies

Date:
March 8, 2007
Source:
University of Manchester
Summary:
A four-year study by sociologists at The University of Manchester has found that women are much more likely than men to make deep and lasting friendships. The investigation into social networks by the University's Research Centre for Socio-Cultural Change found that men are more fickle and calculating about who they should be friends with. Women on the other hand, stand by their friends through thick and thin.

A four-year study by sociologists at The University of Manchester has found that women are much more likely than men to make deep and lasting friendships.

The investigation into social networks by the University’s Research Centre for Socio-Cultural Change found that men are more fickle and calculating about who they should be friends with.

Women on the other hand, stand by their friends through thick and thin.

Adding to the bad news for male prestige, the study confirms the stereotype that men are likely to base their friendship on social drinking.

Of the 10,000 individuals studied who took part in the 1992 to 2002 British Household Panel Surveys, women are much more likely to stay with the same friends.

Single people, older people and white collar workers are also good at paring up.

Middle class people are more likely to cast their net of friendship far wider, whereas the working class tend to stick to their own kind.

Dr Gindo Tampubolon said the findings on female friendship were doubly significant because the data suggests we are much more likely socialise with people from our own gender - 75 per cent of best friends were with the same sex.

Dr Tampubolon, who is based at the School of Social Sciences, said: “Friendship between women seems to be fundamentally different to friendship between men.

“It’s much deeper and more moral: it’s about the relationship itself rather than what they can get out of it.

“Women tend to keep their friends through thick and thin across geography and social mobility.

“And women’s view of friendship has something to do with how they express themselves and form their identity.

“Men, on the other hand are more fickle with their relationships and seem more interested in ‘what’s in it for me’”.

He added: “The findings reflect our view that friendship is not a choice. We have contact with friends, family, neighbourhood and work which we are or are not able to turn into friendships.

“Middle class people are more adept at doing this and tend to define friendship more widely such as work, family and the pub.

“Working class people, on the other hand, are more limited: they’re likely to form a best friend with another working class person.”


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Manchester. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Manchester. "Women Are Best At Being Buddies." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 March 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070308075354.htm>.
University of Manchester. (2007, March 8). Women Are Best At Being Buddies. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070308075354.htm
University of Manchester. "Women Are Best At Being Buddies." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070308075354.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

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