Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Alzheimer's Patients Are Dying Early Because Of Controversial Drugs

Date:
March 31, 2007
Source:
Alzheimer's Research Trust
Summary:
Many Alzheimer's patients are dying earlier because of sedatives they are being prescribed, according to new research from the Alzheimer's Research Trust. Results from a five-year project found that the drugs were linked with a significant increase in long-term mortality.

Rebecca Wood, Chief Executive of the Alzheimer's Research Trust.
Credit: Image courtesy of Alzheimer's Research Trust

Many Alzheimer’s patients are dying earlier because of sedatives they are being prescribed, according to new groundbreaking research from the Alzheimer's Research Trust.

Related Articles


Results from a five-year project, funded by the Alzheimer’s Research Trust and presented at the charity’s conference in Edinburgh, found that the drugs were linked with a significant increase in long-term mortality - with patients dying on average six months earlier.

The investigation by King’s College London researchers found that the sedatives, known as neuroleptics, were associated with a significant deterioration in verbal fluency and cognitive function, and that neuroleptic treatment had no benefit to patients with the mildest symptoms.

Significantly, up to 45% of people with Alzheimer’s disease residing in nursing homes are prescribed neuroleptics as a treatment for behavioural symptoms such as aggression.

Professor Clive Ballard, Professor of Age Related Disorders at King’s College London, and lead researcher on the project, said:

“It is very clear that even over a six month period of treatment, there is no benefit of neuroleptics in treating the behaviour in people with Alzheimer’s disease when the symptoms are mild – specifically when a measure of behavioural disturbance known as the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Score is equal to or less than 14. For people with more severe behavioural symptoms, balancing the potential benefits against increased mortality and other adverse events is more difficult, but this study provides an important evidence base to inform this decision-making process.”

Rebecca Wood, Chief Executive of the Alzheimer’s Research Trust, said:

“These results are deeply troubling and highlight the urgent need to develop better treatments. 700,000 people are affected by dementia in the UK, a figure that will double in the next 30 years. The Government needs to make Alzheimer’s research funding a priority.

“Only 11 is spent on UK research into Alzheimer's for every person affected by the disease, compared to 289 for cancer patients.”

Janet Carter, from West Yorkshire, whose parents were both diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, said: “My father died relatively quickly after he was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and he was prescribed a neuroleptic drug. My mother, who also has Alzheimer’s, is still alive almost a decade after being diagnosed. She was never given these drugs. I don’t know if what happened to my dad is linked to these findings, but either way I’m very shocked by them.”

This is the largest neuroleptic withdrawal study of Alzheimer's patients and the only long-term one of its type.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Alzheimer's Research Trust. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Alzheimer's Research Trust. "Alzheimer's Patients Are Dying Early Because Of Controversial Drugs." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 31 March 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070330230946.htm>.
Alzheimer's Research Trust. (2007, March 31). Alzheimer's Patients Are Dying Early Because Of Controversial Drugs. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 30, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070330230946.htm
Alzheimer's Research Trust. "Alzheimer's Patients Are Dying Early Because Of Controversial Drugs." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070330230946.htm (accessed January 30, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, January 30, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Oxfam Calls for Massive Aid for Ebola-Hit West Africa

Oxfam Calls for Massive Aid for Ebola-Hit West Africa

AFP (Jan. 29, 2015) Oxfam International has called for a multi-million dollar post-Ebola "Marshall Plan", with financial support given by wealthy countries, to help Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia to recover. Duration: 01:10 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Are We Winning The Fight Against Ebola?

Are We Winning The Fight Against Ebola?

Newsy (Jan. 29, 2015) The World Health Organization announced the fight against Ebola has entered its second phase as the number of cases per week has steadily dropped. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Calif. Health Officials Campaign Against E-Cigarettes

Calif. Health Officials Campaign Against E-Cigarettes

Newsy (Jan. 29, 2015) The California Health Department says e-cigarettes are a public health risk for both smokers and those who inhale e-cig smoke secondhand. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Measles Scare Sends 66 Calif. Students Home

Measles Scare Sends 66 Calif. Students Home

AP (Jan. 29, 2015) Officials say 66 students at a Southern California high school have been told to stay home through the end of next week because they may have been exposed to measles and are not vaccinated. (Jan. 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins