Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Sleep Apnea May Increase Risk Of Diabetes

Date:
May 21, 2007
Source:
American Thoracic Society
Summary:
Researchers have found that patients with obstructive sleep apnea are at increased risk for developing of type 2 diabetes, independent of other risk factors. The researchers followed the subjects for up to six years and found that patients diagnosed with sleep apnea had more than two-and-half times the risk of developing diabetes compared with those without the nighttime breathing disorder.

Researchers at the Yale University School of Medicine have found that patients with obstructive sleep apnea are at increased risk for developing of type II diabetes, independent of other risk factors.

The study looked at 593 patients at the VA Connecticut Health Care System referred for evaluation of sleep-disordered breathing. Each patient spent a night in a sleep laboratory to undergo a sleep study, called polysomnography.

The researchers followed the subjects for up to six years and found that patients diagnosed with sleep apnea had more than two-and-half times the risk of developing diabetes compared with those without the nighttime breathing disorder. The patients were then divided into groups based on the severity of their sleep apnea, and the more severe a patient's sleep apnea, the greater the risk of developing diabetes.

In obstructive sleep apnea, the upper airway narrows, or collapses, during sleep. Periods of apnea end with a brief partial arousal that may disrupt sleep up to hundreds of times a night. Obesity is a major risk factor for sleep apnea. Emerging evidence also exists that sleep apnea is associated with hypertension, stroke and heart disease.

The most effective treatment for sleep apnea is a treatment called continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), which delivers air through a mask while the patient sleeps, keeping the airway open. It is successful in treating sleep apnea and improving daytime drowsiness, resulting in an improved quality of life and even reduction in risk for traffic accidents. It has yet to be determined whether treatment for sleep apnea with CPAP can actually improve conditions such as diabetes.

"Our next step will be to determine whether the treatment of sleep apnea can improve an individual's diabetic parameters and consequently the negative health effects of diabetes." says researcher Nader Botros, M.D., of Yale University.

Dr. Botros said that although it is not known exactly what the link is between sleep apnea and diabetes, it is thought that sleep apnea activates the body's fight-or-flight response. This triggers a cascade of events, including the production of high levels of the hormone cortisol that ultimately leads to insulin resistance and glucose intolerance, pre-diabetic conditions that, if left untreated, can lead to the development of diabetes. Low oxygen levels also appear to play an important role.

"The impact of diabetes on public health is great," Dr. Botros says. "Diet and exercise, along with a medication regimen, are the mainstays of treatment, but unfortunately diabetes remains a major public health challenge. New approaches are needed to better understand the risk factors for diabetes in order to develop additional preventive strategies. Understanding the link between sleep-disordered breathing and diabetes may represent one such approach."

The findings were presented at the American Thoracic Society 2007 International Conference, on Monday, May 21. "Obstructive Sleep Apnea as Risk Factor for Type II Diabetes" (Session B35; Abstract # 1898; Poster Board E27).


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Thoracic Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Thoracic Society. "Sleep Apnea May Increase Risk Of Diabetes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 May 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070520183530.htm>.
American Thoracic Society. (2007, May 21). Sleep Apnea May Increase Risk Of Diabetes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070520183530.htm
American Thoracic Society. "Sleep Apnea May Increase Risk Of Diabetes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070520183530.htm (accessed August 1, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Friday, August 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Google (Kind Of) Complies With 'Right To Be Forgotten Law'

Google (Kind Of) Complies With 'Right To Be Forgotten Law'

Newsy (July 31, 2014) Google says it is following Europe's new "Right To Be Forgotten Law," which eliminates user information upon request, but only to a certain degree. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Stroke Signs: Three Hour Deadline

Stroke Signs: Three Hour Deadline

Ivanhoe (July 31, 2014) Sometimes the signs of a stroke are far from easy to recognize. Learn from one young father’s story on the signs of a stroke. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Grain Brain May Be Harming Us

Grain Brain May Be Harming Us

Ivanhoe (July 31, 2014) Could eating carbohydrates be harmful to our brain health? Find out what one neurologist says about changing our diets. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Playground Tales: Learning to Socialize With Autism

Playground Tales: Learning to Socialize With Autism

Ivanhoe (July 31, 2014) Playgrounds are typically great places where kids can have fun while learning how to interact with other kids, but for some kids with autism, they can have the reverse effect. Hear how researchers are trying to change that. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins