Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Minimally Invasive Device Shows Promise In Treating Female Urinary Incontinence

Date:
May 23, 2007
Source:
Emory University
Summary:
A minimally invasive device for treating recurrent stress urinary incontinence in women has been shown to be safe and effective in early clinical trials and is now under review by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), according to urologist.

A minimally invasive device for treating recurrent stress urinary incontinence in women has been shown to be safe and effective in early clinical trials and is now under review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), says Emory University School of Medicine urologist and trial co-principal investigator Niall Galloway, MD.

Preliminary results from the North American Adjustable Continence Therapy (ACT) clinical study group will be presented at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association convened in Anaheim, Calif.

The first phase of the multi-center ACT clinical trial, which included Emory, launched in December 2001 and will conclude in June. It tested the device in 160 women diagnosed with stress urinary incontinence who failed to respond to previous treatments.

During the outpatient procedure, which lasts 20-30 minutes, two adjustable balloons are implanted on each side of a patient's urethra. The ACT clinical trial patients on average reported significant continence improvement one year after undergoing treatment. Complications were usually mild.

"The ACT device spells hope for millions of women dealing with incontinence, particularly those who've experienced severe weakness of the urethra muscles," says Dr. Galloway. "Follow up is needed, but the results we have thus far are promising."

It's estimated that 13 million people in the U.S. suffer from incontinence, or loss of bladder or bowel control. At least 85 percent of sufferers are women.

A broad range of conditions and disorders can cause incontinence, including birth defects, pelvic surgery, injuries to the pelvic region or to the spinal cord, neurological diseases, multiple sclerosis, poliomyelitis, infection and degenerative changes associated with aging. It also can occur as a result of pregnancy or childbirth.

The ACT device developed by Uromedica, Inc. may appeal to women seeking a minimally invasive therapy with a shorter recovery time than offered by traditional incontinence surgical treatments, Dr. Galloway says. With ACT, there are no abdominal or vaginal incisions. The balloons can be adjusted post-operatively as needed, eliminating the risk of overtreatment or undertreatment, challenges posed by some existing therapies, he added. The ACT is also reversible. A similar device called ProACT is being tested in men with stress urinary incontinence after prostate surgery.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Emory University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Emory University. "Minimally Invasive Device Shows Promise In Treating Female Urinary Incontinence." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 May 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070522100803.htm>.
Emory University. (2007, May 23). Minimally Invasive Device Shows Promise In Treating Female Urinary Incontinence. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070522100803.htm
Emory University. "Minimally Invasive Device Shows Promise In Treating Female Urinary Incontinence." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070522100803.htm (accessed July 23, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Newsy (July 23, 2014) An 8-year-old boy helped his younger brother, who has a rare genetic condition that's confined him to a wheelchair, finish a triathlon. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Thousands Who Can't Afford Medical Care Flock to Free US Clinic

Thousands Who Can't Afford Medical Care Flock to Free US Clinic

AFP (July 23, 2014) America may be the world’s richest country, but in terms of healthcare, the World Health Organisation ranks it 37th. Thousands turned out for a free clinic run by "Remote Area Medical" with a visit from the Governor of Virginia. Duration: 2:40 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Stone Fruit Listeria Scare Causes Sweeping Recall

Stone Fruit Listeria Scare Causes Sweeping Recall

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The Wawona Packing Company has issued a voluntary recall on the stone fruit it distributes due to a possible Listeria outbreak. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The 83 new genetic markers could open dozens of new avenues for schizophrenia treatment research. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins