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Magnetic 'Handedness' Could Lead To Better Magnetic Storage Devices

Date:
May 30, 2007
Source:
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory
Summary:
Better magnetic storage devices for computers and other electronics could result from new work by researchers in the United States and Germany. Their findings demonstrate that chirality -- a spiral-like "handedness" -- in nanoscale magnets may play a crucial role in data transmission and manipulation in spintronic devices, where the spin rather than the charge of an electron is used to store data.

Matthias Bode, Center for Nanoscale Materials, is shown with his enhanced spin polarized scanning tunneling microscope (SP-STM). His enhanced technique allows scientists to observe the magnetism of single atoms. Use of this method could lead to better magnetic storage devices for computers and other electronics.
Credit: Image courtesy of DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Better magnetic storage devices for computers and other electronics could result from new work by researchers in the United States and Germany.

Their findings demonstrate that chirality – a spiral-like "handedness" – in nanoscale magnets may play a crucial role in data transmission and manipulation in spintronic devices, where the spin rather than the charge of an electron is used to store data.

While the spins in ferromagnetic materials are simply oriented along one common direction, some nanomagnets were found to exhibit chirality. The term chirality refers to objects that differ from their mirror image like the human hand.

Matthias Bode, a scientist at the Center for Nanoscale Materials at Argonne National Laboratory, said, “In nature many systems have chirality, such as elementary particles with electro-weak interactions organic molecules, hurricanes and even galaxies. Solids with magnetic order of unique chirality are prime candidates for applications, because their peculiar symmetry allows the mixing of electronic, optic, magnetic and structural properties.”

The researchers used spin-sensitive scanning tunneling miscroscopy (STM) and first-principles electronic structure calculations to identify the magnetic order. By making the STM technique sensitive to the spin, it allowed for the observation of the magnetism of single atoms. This extension of STM is known as spin polarized STM or SP-STM and was developed by Bode.

Using his enhanced technique, Bode demonstrated that under a magnetic field the pattern shifted in a given direction, which identified the unique chirality.

The premise for this work was inspired by the pioneering effort of Soviet physicist, Igor Dzyaloshinski. He showed that magnetic order may get twisted into helices with long-period in crystals lacking inversion symmetry, if the spin-orbit interactions are strong enough.

“In the past, this interaction had been considered unimportant in the scientific community," Bode said. "Now its relevance in nanostructures of any dimensionality such as thin films or magnetic particles is realized.”

Results of the research were published in the May 10 issue of the journal Nature. Other researchers involved in this study are M. Heide, G. Bihlmayer and S. Blugel of Julich, Germany and K. von Bergmann, P. Ferriani, S. Heinze, A. Kubetzka, O. Pietzsch and R. Wiesendanger of Institute of Applied Physics and Microstructure Research Center, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany. Funding for this work was provided by the German Science Foundation.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by DOE/Argonne National Laboratory. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

DOE/Argonne National Laboratory. "Magnetic 'Handedness' Could Lead To Better Magnetic Storage Devices." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 May 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070529101030.htm>.
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory. (2007, May 30). Magnetic 'Handedness' Could Lead To Better Magnetic Storage Devices. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070529101030.htm
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory. "Magnetic 'Handedness' Could Lead To Better Magnetic Storage Devices." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070529101030.htm (accessed April 16, 2014).

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