Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Alternative Breast Imaging Techniques Sort Abnormal From Normal Tissue

Date:
June 6, 2007
Source:
Dartmouth College
Summary:
Physicians and engineers have published a study that finds the new methods of electromagnetic imaging offer a high contrast and the ability to distinguish between healthy breast tissue and abnormal tissue.

Steven Poplack, associate professor of radiology and OB/GYN and co-director for breast imaging/mammography and Keith D. Paulsen, professor of engineering
Credit: Joseph Mehling '69

Dartmouth physicians and engineers have published a paper with results from a five-year project testing three new imaging techniques to examine breast abnormalities, including cancer. The study finds that the new methods of electromagnetic imaging offer a high contrast and the ability to distinguish between healthy breast tissue and abnormal tissue.

The interdisciplinary team includes researchers from Dartmouth's Thayer School of Engineering and Dartmouth Medical School working with experts at the Norris Cotton Cancer Center and the Department of Radiology at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center (DHMC). The electromagnetic techniques are electrical impedance spectral imaging (EIS), microwave imaging spectroscopy (MIS), and near infrared (NIR) spectral imaging.

A total of 150 women participated in this study, 97 of whom had an abnormal conventional breast image that was suspicious or highly suggestive of malignancy and were scheduled for a biopsy. The women with abnormal breast images underwent electromagnetic exams prior to biopsy. The researchers compared the abnormal area with the background breast tissue and with a mirror image area in the opposite breast and correlated the data with the biopsy findings. Further analysis led the researchers to determine that the new imaging techniques provided an increase in contrast between 150 to 200 percent to discriminate between breast cancer and benign tissue.

"We put our new imaging techniques to the test to quantify their effectiveness," said Steven Poplack, associate professor of radiology and OB/GYN at Dartmouth Medical School, and co-director for breast imaging/mammography at DHMC, and the lead author of the paper. "Our results show the potential power of using a variety of imaging techniques to get the best possible view of what's going on in the breast tissue."

Specifically, the three techniques demonstrated significant differences in region-of-interest image summaries of normal versus abnormal breasts for EIS, across diagnostic groups for NIR, and for MIS when analysis was restricted to lesions larger than one centimeter. The electromagnetic imaging modalities appeared even more accurate when all are used in concert.

EIS: This painless test uses a very low voltage electrode system to examine how the breast tissue conducts and stores electricity. Living cell membranes carry an electric potential that affect the way a current flows, and different cancer cells have different electrical characteristics.

MIS: This exam involves the propagation of very low levels (1,000 times less than a cell phone) of microwave energy through breast tissue to measure electrical properties. This technique is particularly sensitive to water. Generally, tumors have been found to have more water and blood than regular tissue.

NIR: Infrared light is sensitive to blood, so by sending infrared light through breast tissue with a fiber optic array, the researchers are able to locate and quantify regions of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin. This might help detect early tumor growth and characterize the stage of a tumor by learning about its vascular makeup.

Keith D. Paulsen, professor of engineering and a co-author of the study, is the principal investigator of this research program, which is funded by the National Cancer Institute. Other authors on the paper are Tor D. Tosteson ScD, Wendy A. Wells MD, Brian W. Pogue PhD, Paul M. Meaney PhD, Alexander Hartov PhD, Christine A. Kogel BSN, Sandra K. Soho MS, and Jennifer J. Gibson MS, all associated with Dartmouth's Thayer School of Engineering or Dartmouth Medical School.

Their study appears in the May 2007 issue of Radiology, the journal of the Radiological Society of North America.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Dartmouth College. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Dartmouth College. "Alternative Breast Imaging Techniques Sort Abnormal From Normal Tissue." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 June 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070605132107.htm>.
Dartmouth College. (2007, June 6). Alternative Breast Imaging Techniques Sort Abnormal From Normal Tissue. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070605132107.htm
Dartmouth College. "Alternative Breast Imaging Techniques Sort Abnormal From Normal Tissue." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070605132107.htm (accessed August 28, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Killer Amoeba Found in Louisiana Water System

Killer Amoeba Found in Louisiana Water System

AP (Aug. 28, 2014) State health officials say testing has confirmed the presence of a killer amoeba in a water system serving three St. John the Baptist Parish towns. (Aug. 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Who Could Be Burnt by WHO's E-Cigs Move?

Who Could Be Burnt by WHO's E-Cigs Move?

Reuters - Business Video Online (Aug. 28, 2014) The World Health Organisation has called for the regulation of electronic cigarettes as both tobacco and medical products. Ciara Lee looks at the impact of the move on the tobacco industry. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC Director On Ebola Outbreak: 'It's Worse Than I Feared'

CDC Director On Ebola Outbreak: 'It's Worse Than I Feared'

Newsy (Aug. 28, 2014) CDC director Tom Frieden says the Ebola outbreak is even worse than he feared. But he also said there's still hope to contain it. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
How A 'Rule Of Thumb' Could Slow Down Drinking

How A 'Rule Of Thumb' Could Slow Down Drinking

Newsy (Aug. 28, 2014) A study suggests people who follow a "rule of thumb" when pouring wine dispense less than those who don't have a particular amount in mind. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins