Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Lithium For Pediatric Bipolar Disorder?

Date:
July 19, 2007
Source:
University of Illinois at Chicago
Summary:
Lithium will be evaluated for the treatment of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents in a new study. Pediatric bipolar disorder, also known as manic depressive disorder, is characterized by extreme and unusual changes in mood, ranging from mania to depression. Symptoms of mania can include extreme or persistent euphoria or irritability, inflated self-esteem, increased energy and a decreased need for sleep. Depressive symptoms may include physical complaints such as headaches, tiredness, lack of interest in activities, or social isolation.

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago are participating in a national study to evaluate lithium for the treatment of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents.

Related Articles


"Lithium is the prototype mood stabilizer for treating adult bipolar disorder, but it is not FDA-approved for use in kids younger than 13," said Mani Pavuluri, director of the Pediatric Mood Disorders Clinic at UIC's Institute for Juvenile Research. "We do not have a perfect drug that cures all aspects of bipolar disorder, but knowing more about lithium -- and how it affects children -- may bring us closer to managing this devastating disorder."

Results from the Collaborative Lithium Trials will provide the first comprehensive analysis of lithium treatment for pediatric bipolar disorder, according to Pavuluri.

UIC researchers are recruiting patients between 7 and 17 with bipolar disorder. The study will evaluate medication dosage strategies, drug efficacy, and short- and long-term safety and tolerability.

Pediatric bipolar disorder, also known as manic depressive disorder, is characterized by extreme and unusual changes in mood, ranging from mania to depression. Symptoms of mania can include extreme or persistent euphoria or irritability, inflated self-esteem, increased energy and a decreased need for sleep. Depressive symptoms may include physical complaints such as headaches, tiredness, lack of interest in activities, or social isolation.

In children, the disorder interferes with normal, healthy functioning and is associated with suicide, school failure, and risk-taking behaviors such as sexual promiscuity and substance abuse.

The prevalence and incidence of pediatric bipolar disorder is unknown.

"Lithium has proven to be effective in preventing future episodes of bipolar disorder and reducing suicidal thoughts in adults," said Pavuluri, who leads the UIC trial. "This study will help us to determine if lithium may have a similar protective effect in pediatric patients and help us to develop future treatment protocols."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Illinois at Chicago. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Illinois at Chicago. "Lithium For Pediatric Bipolar Disorder?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 July 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/07/070718001554.htm>.
University of Illinois at Chicago. (2007, July 19). Lithium For Pediatric Bipolar Disorder?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/07/070718001554.htm
University of Illinois at Chicago. "Lithium For Pediatric Bipolar Disorder?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/07/070718001554.htm (accessed February 27, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Mind & Brain News

Friday, February 27, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

The Best Foods to Battle Stress

The Best Foods to Battle Stress

Buzz60 (Feb. 26, 2015) If you&apos;re dealing with anxiety, there are a few foods that can help. Krystin Goodwin (@krystingoodwin) has the best foods to tame stress. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sleeping Too Much Or Too Little Might Increase Stroke Risk

Sleeping Too Much Or Too Little Might Increase Stroke Risk

Newsy (Feb. 26, 2015) People who sleep more than eight hours per night are 45 percent more likely to have a stroke, according to a University of Cambridge study. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Mayor Says District of Columbia to Go Ahead With Pot Legalization

Mayor Says District of Columbia to Go Ahead With Pot Legalization

Reuters - News Video Online (Feb. 25, 2015) Washington&apos;s mayor says the District of Columbia will move forward with marijuana legalization, despite pushback from Congress. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Marijuana Nowhere Near As Deadly As Alcohol: Study

Marijuana Nowhere Near As Deadly As Alcohol: Study

Newsy (Feb. 25, 2015) A new study says marijuana is about 114 times less deadly than alcohol. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins