Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Backache Sufferers Who Fear Pain Change Movements

Date:
August 13, 2007
Source:
Ohio University
Summary:
People who fear aggravating a backache will change the way they move to prevent more pain, a new study finds. But doing so may set the stage for further injury, researchers warn.

Jim Thomas watches as a volunteer models one of the reaching tasks used in the back pain study. The computer screen shows the skeleton picture that results.
Credit: Rick Fatica

People who fear aggravating a backache will change the way they move to prevent more pain, a new study finds. But doing so may set the stage for further injury, researchers warn.

In a study published in the journal Spine, Ohio University researchers Jim Thomas and Christopher France examined 36 adults who recently had experienced lower back pain. They split them into two groups: one that confessed a high fear of aggravating the backache and another that was less afraid of reinjury.

The researchers next asked the participants to perform a series of three reaching tasks designed to simulate everyday activities, such as bending to open a mailbox or leaning to ring a doorbell. Sensors attached to the study subjects recorded their muscle movements.

The study confirmed what researchers have long suspected: People with a high fear of back pain will twist, bend and make other unusual moves to try to avoid more aches. It might be okay to baby sore muscles for a while, but protecting them for too long can cause them to weaken. When those muscles are called into play unexpectedly -- such as lurching forward to grab a bag of falling groceries -- more injury can occur, said Thomas, an associate professor of physical therapy whose study is funded by a four-year, $1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health.

"It's like if you run every day, and then a friend invites you to a game of racquetball," Thomas said, noting that the sports use different muscle groups. "The next day you suddenly feel like you've been run over by a bus."

The latest findings are part of a larger study that also is tracking 100 subjects in Athens and Columbus, Ohio, for a year after their recovery from a back pain injury. This second piece, which will wrap up in May 2008, aims to confirm whether pain avoiders are indeed more likely to reinjure their backs. About half of the data has been collected to date, in partnership with Ohio State University, Thomas said.

Researchers hope the study findings will help physicians create new treatments for backaches, a common ailment. Eight out of 10 adults will suffer from back pain at some point in their lives. While many of those aches go away on their own, about half of those people will experience a recurrence of pain within the following year. Medical expenses and work absenteeism due to back pain disability are estimated at $20 billion to $40 billion per year in the United States, according to the researchers.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Ohio University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Ohio University. "Backache Sufferers Who Fear Pain Change Movements." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 August 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070806170318.htm>.
Ohio University. (2007, August 13). Backache Sufferers Who Fear Pain Change Movements. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070806170318.htm
Ohio University. "Backache Sufferers Who Fear Pain Change Movements." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070806170318.htm (accessed September 30, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

How 'Yes Means Yes' Defines Sexual Assault

How 'Yes Means Yes' Defines Sexual Assault

Newsy (Sep. 29, 2014) Aimed at reducing sexual assaults on college campuses, California has adopted a new law changing the standard of consent for sexual activity. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists May Have Found An Early Sign Of Pancreatic Cancer

Scientists May Have Found An Early Sign Of Pancreatic Cancer

Newsy (Sep. 29, 2014) Researchers looked at 1,500 blood samples and determined people who developed pancreatic cancer had more branched chain amino acids. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Colo. Doctors See Cluster of Enterovirus Cases

Colo. Doctors See Cluster of Enterovirus Cases

AP (Sep. 29, 2014) Doctors at the Children's Hospital of Colorado say they have treated over 4,000 children with serious respiratory illnesses since August. Nine of the patients have shown distinct neurological symptoms, including limb weakness. (Sept. 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Dr.'s Unsure of Cause of Fast-Spreading Virus

Dr.'s Unsure of Cause of Fast-Spreading Virus

AP (Sep. 29, 2014) Doctors at the Children's Hospital of Colorado say they have treated over 4,000 children with serious respiratory illnesses since August. Nine of the patients have shown distinct neurological symptoms, including limb weakness. (Sept. 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins