Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Acute Sleep Deprivation Leads To Changes In Nighttime Urine Production For Men And Women

Date:
August 9, 2007
Source:
American Physiological Society
Summary:
Researchers have examined the urinary patterns of sleep-deprived volunteers and have found that a lack of sleep leads to increased urinary output and more salt in urine. The findings were found to be more prevalent in males than females.

Our body’s production of urine follows a circadian rhythm. During the day, we experience greater urinary frequency; at night, urine production declines, enabling us to get uninterrupted sleep.

The regulation of urine excretion during nighttime hours is influenced by many factors, including hormones, blood flow (hemodynamics), and sleep-related factors. The mechanism behind the day/night changes is not yet clear. Danish researchers have examined the urinary patterns of sleep-deprived volunteers and have found that a lack of sleep leads to increased urinary output and more salt in urine. The findings were found to be more prevalent in males than females.

The study

The study team is comprised of Birgitte Mahler, Kostantinos Kamperis, Soeren Hagstroem, Eva Radvanska, Soren Rittig, and J.C. Djurhuus, all of the Aarhus University Hospital, Brendstrupgaardsvej, Aarhus, Denmark. Dr. Mahler will present her team’s findings, entitled, “Sleep Deprivation and Nocturnal Urine Output – Gender Difference in the Effect,” at the upcoming conference, Sex and Gender in Cardiovascular-Renal Physiology and Pathophysiology. The meeting, sponsored by the American Physiological Society, is being held August 9-12, 2007 at the Hyatt Regency Austin on Town Lake, Austin, TX.

Methodology

Twenty healthy volunteers (ten males; ten females; 19-35 years of age) underwent two 24-hour circadian in-patient studies under standardized conditions for diet and fluid intake. Participants were sleep deprived during one of the two sessions in a randomized sequence. Their blood pressure and heart rate were recorded every hour using a non-invasive blood pressure monitor. Electrolytes, osmolarity, creatine and urea were evaluated in plasma and urine. Key blood elements were also measured. Excretions and clearances were calculated for electrolytes and osmoles.

Key findings

There were no significant differences in the quantity or contents of the daytime urine examined in both experimental periods. Following the sleep deprivation period, however, both genders produced markedly larger amounts of urine. This effect was significantly more pronounced in males than females.

Sleep deprivation reduced the nighttime dip in blood pressure which can explain the lower levels of nighttime plasma rennin, angiotensin II and aldosterone and the increase in sodium and potassium excretion. The relatively higher blood pressure on sleep deprivation nights may also have affected the blood pressure in the kidney producing an osmotic diuresis.

The researchers found that during nighttime, acute sleep deprivation leads to:

  • an increased urine output more evident in males
  • a reduced fall in blood pressure (reduced nighttime dip)
  • lower levels of sodium regulating hormones (plasma rennin, angiotensin II and aldosterone)
  • excessive excretion of osmoles (sodium and potassium).

A change in the body’s hemodynamics, caused by sleep deprivation, seems to account for these observations.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Physiological Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Physiological Society. "Acute Sleep Deprivation Leads To Changes In Nighttime Urine Production For Men And Women." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 August 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070808165839.htm>.
American Physiological Society. (2007, August 9). Acute Sleep Deprivation Leads To Changes In Nighttime Urine Production For Men And Women. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070808165839.htm
American Physiological Society. "Acute Sleep Deprivation Leads To Changes In Nighttime Urine Production For Men And Women." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070808165839.htm (accessed July 24, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Newsy (July 23, 2014) An 8-year-old boy helped his younger brother, who has a rare genetic condition that's confined him to a wheelchair, finish a triathlon. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Thousands Who Can't Afford Medical Care Flock to Free US Clinic

Thousands Who Can't Afford Medical Care Flock to Free US Clinic

AFP (July 23, 2014) America may be the world’s richest country, but in terms of healthcare, the World Health Organisation ranks it 37th. Thousands turned out for a free clinic run by "Remote Area Medical" with a visit from the Governor of Virginia. Duration: 2:40 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Stone Fruit Listeria Scare Causes Sweeping Recall

Stone Fruit Listeria Scare Causes Sweeping Recall

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The Wawona Packing Company has issued a voluntary recall on the stone fruit it distributes due to a possible Listeria outbreak. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The 83 new genetic markers could open dozens of new avenues for schizophrenia treatment research. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins