Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Counselling Conquers Constipation

Date:
September 14, 2007
Source:
British Association For The Advancement Of Science
Summary:
Psychological factors can make people more likely to suffer physical illness, but cognitive behavioural therapy can help sufferers manage their condition. "People often pigeonhole diseases as being biological or psychological, but in fact they're often a complex mixture of both," according to a researcher. She and her colleagues studied 1000 people who contracted either glandular fever or food poisoning. They wanted to see who would go on to develop irritable bowel syndrome.

Psychological factors can make people more likely to suffer physical illness, but cognitive behavioural therapy can help sufferers manage their condition.

"People often pigeonhole diseases as being biological or psychological, but in fact they're often a complex mixture of both," Professor Rona Moss-Morriss of the University of Southampton told the BA Festival of Science on September 10.

She and her colleagues studied 1000 people who contracted either glandular fever or food poisoning. They wanted to see who would go on to develop irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

The symptoms of IBS are severe stomach pain, with diarrhoea or constipation or both.  The people with food poisoning were more likely to develop IBS, perhaps because both conditions affect the stomach.  But psychological factors were important, too.

The researchers asked the patients how they felt when they had food poisoning, what they did and what they believed.  They found that those who were more stressed, and who had very high expectations of themselves, were more likely to develop IBS.

Having high expectations manifested itself in an "all-or-nothing" pattern of behaviour, in which people would try to ignore the symptoms to fulfil their normal obligations, only to collapse in bed, try to get up too quickly, and collapse again.

The researchers have submitted a study for publication in which they used the psychological intervention called cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) to help people with IBS. "It appears to be a promising approach," they said.

Their new study follows one in which some IBS patients were given CBT along with an anti-spasmodic drug, mebeverine, while others received mebeverine alone.  Those who received CBT as well saw their symptoms improve.

Professor Trudie Chalder of Kings College London said a study of patients with type 1 diabetes would give "good news" when it is published shortly. Her results were, she said, "extremely promising."

She used CBT to address people's beliefs about their diabetes.  For example, some people will say: "There's nothing I can do to control my diabetes because it's a biological disease which I have no control over."  Having used CBT to challenge such beliefs, Professor Chalder aimed to improve people's blood sugar levels by encouraging them to exercise regularly and eat a healthy diet. 

The researchers are also aiming to use CBT to help people adjust to having multiple sclerosis.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by British Association For The Advancement Of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

British Association For The Advancement Of Science. "Counselling Conquers Constipation." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 September 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070912160935.htm>.
British Association For The Advancement Of Science. (2007, September 14). Counselling Conquers Constipation. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070912160935.htm
British Association For The Advancement Of Science. "Counselling Conquers Constipation." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070912160935.htm (accessed April 25, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Friday, April 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Could Marijuana Use Lead To Serious Heart Problems?

Could Marijuana Use Lead To Serious Heart Problems?

Newsy (Apr. 24, 2014) — A new study says marijuana use could lead to serious heart-related complications. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Study Says Most Crime Not Linked To Mental Illness

Study Says Most Crime Not Linked To Mental Illness

Newsy (Apr. 22, 2014) — A new study finds most crimes committed by people with mental illness are not caused by symptoms of their illness or disorder. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Smaller Plates And Cutlery Could Make You Feel Fuller

How Smaller Plates And Cutlery Could Make You Feel Fuller

Newsy (Apr. 22, 2014) — NBC's "Today" conducted an experiment to see if changing the size of plates and utensils affects the amount individuals eat. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Do We Get Nicer With Age?

Do We Get Nicer With Age?

Newsy (Apr. 22, 2014) — A recent report claims personality can change over time as we age, and usually that means becoming nicer and more emotionally stable. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins