Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Nuclear Medicine Now Safer Than Ever

Date:
October 11, 2007
Source:
National Physical Laboratory
Summary:
Hospitals are now able to ensure that the correct dose is administered to the 670,000 patients that undergo nuclear medicine procedures every year due to a new device. The number of nuclear medicine procedures has increased by 36% over the last 10 years. 240 NHS sites around the country now use nuclear medicine, mostly for diagnostic scans on areas such as bone, lung perfusion, myocardium and the kidneys. Nuclear medicine is also used in cancer and thyroid therapy.

Hospitals are now able to ensure that the correct dose is administered to the 670,000 patients that undergo nuclear medicine procedures every year due to a new device developed by scientists at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL).

Related Articles


The number of nuclear medicine procedures has increased by 36% over the last 10 years. 240 NHS sites around the country now use nuclear medicine, mostly for diagnostic scans on areas such as bone, lung perfusion, myocardium and the kidneys. Nuclear medicine is also used in cancer and thyroid therapy.

For most diagnostic procedures, radioactive compounds are injected into the body so that physiological images can be made with gamma cameras. Of course, the exact radioactivity of the dose is crucial, not only to the ultimate safety of the patient but also to the quality of the procedure. A low dose can result in inconclusive images whereas a high dose could cause harm to the patient.

A new instrument, called 'Fidelis', allows medical physicists to check their in-house instruments against the UK national standards for radioactivity. Once confident that their own instruments are measuring activity correctly, the right dose should always be given to the patient.

The instrument is comprised of an ionisation chamber designed by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), the UK's national measurement institute and a brand new computer-controlled electrometer module from Southern Scientific Ltd (which manufactures and sells the instrument). An ionisation chamber is a gas filled enclosure between two conducting electrodes. When a radioactive source is placed near to the enclosure, gamma-rays emitted by the source ionise the gas -- thus creating a current that can be measured by the electrometer.

Previously hospitals have used off-the-shelf Radionuclide Calibrators which needed re-calibrating every time new applications for nuclear medicine or a new design of vial came on stream. With Fidelis, this problem is solved.

'The ionisation chamber is an identical version of the master chamber here,' says Piers de Lavison, the Head of Radionuclide Metrology at NPL. 'It's like having NPL in a box -- it is a great example of how our work contributes to quality assurance in healthcare, something that touches all our lives.'


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Physical Laboratory. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

National Physical Laboratory. "Nuclear Medicine Now Safer Than Ever." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 October 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071010111849.htm>.
National Physical Laboratory. (2007, October 11). Nuclear Medicine Now Safer Than Ever. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071010111849.htm
National Physical Laboratory. "Nuclear Medicine Now Safer Than Ever." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071010111849.htm (accessed November 1, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, November 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Melafind: Spotting Melanoma Without a Biopsy

Melafind: Spotting Melanoma Without a Biopsy

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) The MelaFind device is a pain-free way to check suspicious moles for melanoma, without the need for a biopsy. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Battling Multiple Myeloma

Battling Multiple Myeloma

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) The answer isn’t always found in new drugs – repurposing an ‘old’ drug that could mean better multiple myeloma treatment, and hope. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Chronic Inflammation and Prostate Cancer

Chronic Inflammation and Prostate Cancer

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) New information that is linking chronic inflammation in the prostate and prostate cancer, which may help doctors and patients prevent cancer in the future. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sickle Cell: Stopping Kids’ Silent Strokes

Sickle Cell: Stopping Kids’ Silent Strokes

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) Blood transfusions are proving crucial to young sickle cell patients by helping prevent strokes, even when there is no outward sign of brain injury. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins